bias

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Related to Bias voltage: bias current, Quiescent point, operating point

bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, one can estimate the drift mobility of the ions [mu] from the time-of-flight of the ions between the electrodes of the MOM stacks [tau] determined from the kinetics of charging due to the ion migration polarization when applying a bias voltage between the electrodes [17].
The second state has a bias voltage of 30 V on the red circled elements in Figure 7, and these elements are not radiating.
Compared with the C[H.sub.3]N[H.sub.3]Pb[I.sub.3] perovskite films which applied (~8 V, +0 V) (Figures 4(d)-4(f)), PFM phase images of the C[H.sub.3]N[H.sub.3]Pb[I.sub.3] perovskite films show a clear distinction in the presence of an additional DC bias voltage of +3 V (Figures 5(a)-5(c)).
When the bias voltage exceeds 0 V, the real normal load initially decreases with increasing bias voltage and then it increased, which matched the measured results.
There are also curves at bias voltages of 2.5 and 2.7 V in Fig.
Caption: Figure 2.(a),(b) Electrostatic potential, (c) electron concentration, (d) and hole concentration in an n-type semiconductor at a bias voltage of V=-0.25V.
The C structure spin-resolved I-V curves in the bias voltage range from 0.0 to 1.4 V are shown in Fig.
As can be deduced by the figure and the m values in Table 2, transition point (in terms of bias voltage) from one current conduction mechanism to another is affected by temperature such that higher temperature cause the transition happen at lower bias voltages.
The transmission spectra at different bias voltage and IV characteristics are plotted and compared for both pure and doped [C.sub.28] molecules.
The rate of conversion of Al to alumina is proportional to the bias voltage, so the amount of Al converted to alumina also increases with the bias voltage.
A similar AFM nanoprocessing method has previously been developed and evaluated in our research group on a Si(100) surface without bias voltage [35-40].