bezoar

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bezoar

 [be´zor]
a mass formed in the stomach by compaction of ingested material that does not pass into the intestine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·zoar

(bē'zōr),
A concretion formed in the alimentary canal of animals, and occasionally humans; formerly considered to be a useful medicine with magical properties and apparently still used for this purpose in some countries; according to the substance forming the ball, may be termed trichobezoar (hairball), trichophytobezoar (hair and vegetable fiber mixed), or phytobezoar (food ball).
[Pers. padzahr, antidote]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bezoar

(bē′zôr′)
n.
A hard indigestible mass of material, such as hair, plant fibers, or seeds, found in the stomach or intestine of animals, especially ruminants and sometimes humans. Bezoars were formerly considered to be antidotes to poisons and to possess magic properties.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A mass of foreign material in the stomach—food, mucus, vegetable fiber, hair, or other indigestible material—facilitated by partial or complete gastrectomy, as acid hydrolysis of gastric content is decreased; the mass is more easily palpable in trichobezoars than in phytobezoars
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bezoar

Gastroenterology A mass of foreign material in the stomach–food, mucus, vegetable fiber, hair, or other indigestible material, facilitated by partial or complete gastrectomy, as acid hydrolysis of gastric content is ↓; undigested bezoars cause discomfort or pain, halitosis,
gastric erosion or ulceration and potentially peritonitis, hemorrhage, obstruction, N&V; the mass is more easily palpable in tricho- than in
phytobezoars
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

be·zoar

(bē'zōr)
A concretion formed in the alimentary canal of animals, and occasionally humans; formerly considered to be a useful medicine with magical properties and apparently still used for this purpose in some places; according to the substance forming the ball, may be termed trichobezoar (hairball), trichophytobezoar (hair and vegetable fiber mixed), or phytobezoar (foodball).
[Pers. padzahr, antidote]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bezoar

A ball of hair and other material forming in the stomach or intestine and rare in the psychologically normal. In more gullible times bezoars have been valued for their magical properties.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Rapunzel,

legendary young woman whose long hair allowed her to escape from a tower in which she was held captive.
Rapunzel syndrome - internal matter that has formed a compact body that occasionally assumes the appearance of strands of twisted hair that extend from a bezoar through the intestine. Synonym(s): bezoar
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

be·zoar

(bē'zōr)
A concretion formed in the alimentary canal of animals, and occasionally humans; formerly considered to be a useful medicine with magical properties and apparently still used for this purpose in some countries; according to the substance forming the ball, may be termed trichobezoar (hairball), trichophytobezoar (hair and vegetable fiber mixed), or phytobezoar (food ball).
[Pers. padzahr, antidote]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(3) But the story I would like to tell takes place between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, which was the heyday of bezoar stones. It is the story of how the bezoar found its way from the mountains of Persia to the European markets, then to the highlands of Peru and back to Europe, and what happened to the bezoar during this trip.
In his letter, proudly quoted by Monardes, Osma reports having learned about the Asian bezoars from Monardes' essay and discovered bezoar stones in Andean animals, samples of which he sent along to the well-known physician so that he could examine and test them in his practice of medicine.
"Mounted Bezoar Stones, Seychelles Nuts, and Rhinoceros Horns: Decorative Objects as Antidotes in Early Modern Europe." Studies in the Decorative Arts 11.1 (2003-2004): 69-94.
"From Marvelous Antidote to the Poison of Idolatry: The Transatlantic Role of Andean Bezoar Stones during the Late Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries." Hispanic American Historical Review 90.1 (2010): 3-39.
My interest in learning about the bezoar stone comes from my experience as a reader of chronicles of the New World.
It is not a surprise that we find mentions of the bezoar stone in the commentaries on Dioscorides's De materia medica written by Andrea Mattioli in 1544, and by Andres Laguna in 1555.
One of them is the Oriental bezoar stone, which had not yet been discovered in the Americas by Europeans.
In his book, written in Spanish, Cristobal Acosta devoted a full chapter to the bezoar stone, based mostly on Garcia da Orta--whose Colloquies served as a guide to his book--and, of course, on Monardes.
This time all that Monardes had published under the title of "Medicinal History" was there, including all he wrote on the bezoar stone. Even if all Clusius had done had been to translate the work, it would have been a great addition to the information on the bezoar available in Europe, but bezoars were among the New World products that particularly captured Clusius' imagination.
Actually, the bezoar stone is found as a calculus or concretion in the stomachs or intestines of various ruminants, such as antelopes, camels, deer, and goats.
Arsenite ions were a different story, because although bezoar stone removed them the brushite moiety was ineffective.
If however such a differentiation has any value, then the famous bezoar stone must belong to folk medicine.