Davis

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Davis

 [da´vis]
Mary E. P. (1858–1924). Nursing educator and organizer and one of the founders of the American Journal of Nursing. She helped found the American Society of Superintendents of Training Schools for Nurses (later the League of Nursing Education), which became part of the National League for Nursing. She was a strong advocate of the development of nursing education, with its own theory and curriculum.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
David M., 20th-century U.S. urologist.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
John Staige, U.S. surgeon, 1872-1946. See: Davis graft, Crowe-Davis mouth gag.

Da·vis

(dā'vis),
Hallowell, U.S. physiologist, 1896-1992. See: Davis battery model of transduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
I do mean William Wyler's "The Letter,'' starring Bette Davis as a woman who murders her lover and "River of No Return'' starring Marilyn Monroe as a tough saloon singer fighting turbulent rapids, Indians and Robert Mitchum.
I was lucky enough to have my 2002 book, Bette Davis: The Performances That Made Her Great, reviewed in the G&LR.
Another Bette Davis Psycho-Biddy classic, nearly all shot at Houmas House (40136 Highway 942 near Darrow, La.), a Greek Revival mansion that was once one of the richest and largest plantations in the world.
The Girl Who Walked Home Alone: Bette Davis, A Personal Biography is a recommended pick for any collection strong in movie star biographies, especially those which aren't overstocked on Bette Davis coverage's already.
The company even issued a $28,000 policy against actress Bette Davis gaining weight.
Holding no hypocricy sacred, chapters such as "O' Foreskin, Where Art Thou?" and "The Crisis in Pubic Hair" do not hestiate to push the envelope on human sexuality, while "Letter to Dave Barry", "The Insatiable Meat Cleaver of Bette Davis", and "Letter to Ann Coulter" challenge other public figures in an eye-popping manner.
Mankiewicz's picture (coincidentally based on a short story published the same year as Maugham's novel), is all about the relationship between the aging Margo Channing (Bette Davis) and the cunning ingenue Eve (Anne Baxter), who is out to usurp her position.
Included in this collection are Bette Davis, Olivia de Havilland, Joan Blondell, and Jane Wyman, along with some who never achieved their fame, such as Andrea King, Joan Leslie, and Nancy Coleman.
Blase Bausch veteran dancer Nazareth Panadero (a reincarnated Bette Davis) kissed men--including some in the first row--on the forehead, sighing "It's a job!" A chicken nibbled on smashed watermelon, and dancers swam in a plastic water flume, and a fake walrus lumbered across the stage.
Broadway star Margo Channing (Bette Davis) is at the crest of a brilliant career when poor little Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter) shows up at the stage door, begging for an autograph and an audience.
I am Bette Davis in Now, Voyager: the maiden aunt, the dutiful daughter, the social failure and the sexual incompetent.