Bergmann's rule


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Related to Bergmann's rule: Gloger's rule

Bergmann's rule

(bûrg′mənz)
n.
The principle that in wide-ranging, warm-blooded animal species, individuals living in a cold climate tend to be larger than individuals of that same species living in a warm climate.

Bergmann's rule

a rule stating that individuals from populations of warmblooded species of animals (HOMOIOTHERMS) which occur in cooler climates tend to be larger on average than individuals of the same species in warmer climates. This is because the surface area/volume ratio in large animals is smaller, so that heat loss is consequently reduced. The rule is named after the German biologist W. Bergmann, and was formulated in 1847. See also ALLEN'S RULE.
References in periodicals archive ?
2003: Bergmann's rule in shrews: geographical variation of body size in Palearctic Sorex species.
Their findings from this large dataset showed that "body size generally conformed to Bergmann's Rule.
Dichroplus vittatus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) follows the converse to Bergmann's rule although male morphological variability increases with latitude.
Conformity to Bergmann's rule in the Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae Hodgson, 1857) on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.
Energy and interspecific body size patterns of amphibian faunas in Europe and North America: anurans follow Bergmann's rule, urodeles its converse.
Temperature per se may explain Bergmann's rule in ectotherms (Atkinson & Sibly 1997, Blanckenhorn & Demont 2004), but not its converse, except when temperature operates as an indirect selective factor on body size by limiting nymphal growth and development (Masaki 1967).
Peters 1983), body size tends to directly parallel development time, and likely leads to the converse of Bergmann's Rule that has been reported for insects.
Hence, these two species follow the converse Bergmann's Rule, as is observed in many other terrestrial insects (Blanckenhorn & Demont 2004, Dillon et al.
Rules, as opposed to exceptions, are seen in Bergmann's rule for the size of animal species in their northern range, and Allen's rule for the size of their extremities (Moment, 1967).
In fact, the early literature on Bergmann's rule in both ecto- and endotherms often assumes that geographic differences in the character reflect adaptive developmental responses to local temperatures and not genetic differentiation among populations.
Washington, Feb 25 (ANI): Scientists have across new clues that offers new insight to Bergmann's rule that animals grow larger at high, cold latitudes than their counterparts closer to the equator.
There are numerous examples in which Bergmann's rule appears to hold and others in which it does not (see summary in Meiri et al.