genesis

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genesis

 [jen´ĕ-sis]
creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g., carcinogenesis.

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis),
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

/gen·e·sis/ (jen´ĕ-sis) [Gr.] creation; origination.

genesis

[jen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, origin
1 the origin, generation, or developmental evolution of anything.
2 the act of producing or procreating.

genesis

The beginning of a process

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis)
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

Origins, beginnings or the process of being formed.

genesis

creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g. carcinogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hatan Bereshit, refers to the one chosen for the honor of commencing the reading of the Torah on Simchat Torah, while the Hatan Torah was the member chosen for the honor of the last reading of the Torah on Simchat Torah.
Bereshit Rabbati, Yerahme'el, Pugio Fidei, and Yalqut Shimoni.
Shimon bar Yochai [traditionally ascribed author], Midrash Hane'elam, Bereshit, Parshat Hayei Sarah, in Sefer HaZohar (Vilna, 1923), 125a.
1:26, "Let us make man" is addressed to angels can be found in the "orthodox" rabbinic voice of Bereshit Rabba 8, as pointed out in the important Runia, "Where is the Jew.
Bereshit Rabbah 29:11 explains that Abraham was empowered to bestow blessings upon others, an ability that until then was reserved for God himself; now Abraham will be His partner in this regard.
In "Written Bones," produced between 1983 and 1984, Dautricourt used a pen and Chinese ink to repeatedly write bereshit, the Hebrew word for "in the beginning" and the first word of the Torah, on animal bones.
1:1 is found in the work of Rabbi Yore Toy Lipmann of Muelhausen: "Here the heretics have erred in saying that bereshit is the Holy One, who is called the First One, and that he created Elohim [God]--which they interpret to mean as Jesus.
Daniel Matt (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004), Bereshit, section 1, 13a-13b, p.
bereshit bara elohim et hashamayim ve et ha'aretz,' and since then I've learned to read at least in the [Hebrew] language.
Also see the introduction to the Midrash ha-gadol: Bereshit, by Mordecai Marguiles (Jerusalem, 5707/1947), 11.
Eliezer Ashkenazi, Ma'aseh Adonai, Ma'aseh Bereshit (Venice, 1583), Chap.