genesis

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genesis

 [jen´ĕ-sis]
creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g., carcinogenesis.

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis),
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

/gen·e·sis/ (jen´ĕ-sis) [Gr.] creation; origination.

genesis

[jen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, origin
1 the origin, generation, or developmental evolution of anything.
2 the act of producing or procreating.

genesis

The beginning of a process

gen·e·sis

(jen'ĕ-sis)
An origin or beginning process; also used as combining form in suffix position.
[G.]

genesis

Origins, beginnings or the process of being formed.

genesis

creation; origination; used as a word termination joined to an element indicating the thing created, e.g. carcinogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The congregation's governing body consisted of a council of elders that included the parnas, the Hatan Bereshit, the Hatan Torah and a number of elders also known as assistants, or adjuntos.
The other Hebrew term, so important for Maimonides in the Guide, is ma'aseh bereshit, which means "Account of the Beginning.
He draws a comparison between the explosion of the big bang and the Bereshit, and follows with a series of images invoking the colour and the configuration of the explosion: 'ao olho-mente quase um telefilme' (p.
In Guide for the Perplexed, Maimonides cites a brilliant rabbinical comment from the Bereshit Rabba: "To Abraham, whose prophetic power was great, the angels appeared in the form of men; to Lot, whose prophetic power was weak, they appeared as angels.
Also see the introduction to the Midrash ha-gadol: Bereshit, by Mordecai Marguiles (Jerusalem, 5707/1947), 11.
Ashkenazi in section Ma'aseh Bereshit, chap 31, fols.
But according to the great German sociologist Max Weber, it was Judaism that first led to what he calls Western rationality, which made science possible, and the reason it did so was because Bereshit Chapter One is the first act of demythologizing the universe.
I have a friend, Rabbi Menashe Klein [the head of a yeshiva underwritten by Wiesel and named for his father], who quoted to me the verse in Bereshit about Ya'akov: be-makli avarti et ha-yarden [I crossed the Jordan only with my cane].
Shimon bar Yochai [traditionally ascribed author], Midrash Hane'elam, Bereshit, Parshat Hayei Sarah, in Sefer HaZohar (Vilna, 1923), 125a.