barberry

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barberry

Herbal medicine
A deciduous shrub, the bark and fruit of which contain alkaloids (berberine, columbamine, oxyacanthine, palmatine and others), resin, starch and tannins; it is antibacterial, anticonvulsant, antiviral and vasodilatory; it has been used internally for anaemia, cholera, constipation, diarrhoea, gallstones, hangover, heartburn, hepatitis, hypertension, menstrual pains and splenomegaly, and topically for conjunctivitis, skin infections and sore throats.
 
Toxicity
It should not be used in pregnancy as berberine stimulates uterine contractions.

bar·ber·ry

(bahr'ber-ē)
(Mahonia vulgaris, Berberis aquifolium) Available in many forms (e.g., extract, infusion); purported uses include as an antidiarrheal, antipyretic, and as a cough suppressant. Potential toxicity in pregnancy.
Synonym(s): jaundice berry, Oregon grape, sowberry, wood sour.
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of Berberis vulgaris Extract Cytotoxicity against Normal Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs).
The cells were incubated for 48 h with increasing concentrations of extracts of Berberis vulgaris and berberine molecule, and then the cytotoxic activity was measured by the MTT test as described in the Materials and Methods section.
Pharmacological investigation on the cardiovascular effects of Berberis vulgaris on tested animals.
Abbasi, "Some physicochemical properties of Iranian native barberry fruits (abi and poloei): Berberis integerrima and Berberis vulgaris," Journal of Food and Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol.
Recent research has suggested that Berberis vulgaris fruits have an important role for human health and nutrition.
Mahonia aquifolium), Berberis vulgaris, Coptis chinensis (and some other Coptis spp.), Phellodendron amurense and Phellodendron chinense.
Berberine is identified as an active component in the roots, rhizome, and stem bark of Berberis vulgaris (barberry), Berberis aguifolium (Oregon grape), Berberis aristata (tree turmeric), and Tinospora cordifolia (Craig, 1999).
Follow-up treatment may include immunostimulation (Echinacea spp), adaptogenic (Eleuthrococcus senticosus) and anti-allergenic herbs (Scutellaria baicalensis, Tylophora asthmatica and/or Gingko biloba), digestive and liver tonics (Berberis vulgaris, Rumex crispus and Silybum marianum), lymphatic herbs (Iris versicolor, Galium aparine) and nervines (Avena sativa, Melissa officinalis, Tilia cordata); with a review of exercise, relaxation techniques and diet.
Total Berberis vulgaris 1:2 20 mL Matricaria recutita 1:2 20 mL Echinacea root blend 1:2 25 mL Hydrastic canadensis 1:3 15 mL Althea officinalis 1:5 20 mL TOTAL 100 mL Dose 5 mL twice daily for the first week, thereafter 7.5 mL twice daily.
Berberine is an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid that has been isolated from Berberis aquifolium (Oregon grape), Berberis aristata (tree turmeric), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), and Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal) (Ikram, 1975).
The three most common herbs that fit into this discussion are Oregon mountain grape (Berberis aquifolium), barberry (Berberis vulgaris) and golden seal (Hydrastis canadensis).