benzodiazepine

(redirected from Benzodiazepene)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Benzodiazepene: benzodiazepine drugs

benzodiazepine

 [ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn]
any of a group of drugs having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects. The group includes the sedative-hypnotics chlordiazepoxide (librium), clorazepate (tranxene), diazepam (valium), flurazepam (dalmane), and oxazepam (serax), which are used as antianxiety agents; and clonazepam (klonopin), an anticonvulsant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn),
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (for example, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

benzodiazepine

(bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics.
 
Effects
Sedation, hypnosis, reduced motor activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsive.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychological dependence.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

Pharmacology A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics Effects Sedation, hypnotic, ↓ activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Physical and psychological dependence
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (e.g., diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Benzodiazepine

A class of drugs that have a hypnotic and sedative action, used mainly as tranquilizers to control symptoms of anxiety.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
Class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in pharmacological profiles of new generation of benzodiazepenes and nonbenzodiozepene hypnotics.
Medications include antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), as well as drugs known as high-potency benzodiazepenes. Some people with a form of social phobia called performance phobia have been helped by beta-blockers, which are more commonly used to control high blood pressure.
She describes how antidepressants, sleeping pills, and other benzodiazepenes work; the basics of going off of them; withdrawal symptoms; managing psychological symptoms; acute, post-acute, and protracted withdrawal; coping tools; stimulants, supplements, and dietary modifications; supporting someone in withdrawal; suicidal ideation; tips for counselors and doctors; employment and debt issues; recovery; closure; moving on; and success stories.
Benzodiazepenes, coccaine and misoprostol has also been implicated as the cause of Mobius syndrome.