benzodiazepine

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benzodiazepine

 [ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn]
any of a group of drugs having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects. The group includes the sedative-hypnotics chlordiazepoxide (librium), clorazepate (tranxene), diazepam (valium), flurazepam (dalmane), and oxazepam (serax), which are used as antianxiety agents; and clonazepam (klonopin), an anticonvulsant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn),
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (for example, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

benzodiazepine

(bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics.
 
Effects
Sedation, hypnosis, reduced motor activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsive.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychological dependence.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

Pharmacology A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics Effects Sedation, hypnotic, ↓ activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Physical and psychological dependence
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (e.g., diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Benzodiazepine

A class of drugs that have a hypnotic and sedative action, used mainly as tranquilizers to control symptoms of anxiety.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
Class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"For example, minor tranquilizers and benzodiazapines rank fourth among therapeutic classes in the cash category but fall to 10th in third-party and Medicaid prescriptions."
* For 20 years, physicians at one VA medical center freely provided Valium to a veteran who became addicted to benzodiazapines. While on vacation, he visited a Florida VA medical center, was abruptly removed from Valium, and went into seizures.
Once I fill my prescription at The Greener Side - which provides a single medication, cannabis - I can stroll a couple of blocks south to Hiron's and fill prescriptions for opiates, amphetamines, benzodiazapines, muscle relaxants, lithium (I can keep going, just let me grab my Physicians' Desk Reference).
Anxioloytics or benzodiazapines may help minimize anxiety and distress around feelings of breathlessness; however, opioids such as morphine are often first-line therapy for the relief of dyspnea (Kang et al., 2005).
Summary of Abused Substances Number (%) of Nursing Abused Substance Abusing Substance Alcohol 149 (72) Legal oral opioids 93 (45) * Meperidine hydrochloride (Demerol[R]) * Oxycodone and aspirin (Percodan[R]) * Hydrocodone and acetaminophen (Vicodin[R]) * Codeine Inhalants 17 (8) Stimulants 48 (23) * Crack-cocaine * Methamphetamine * Cocaine Marijuana 44 (21) Legal injected narcotics 65 (31) * Morphine sulfate * Meperidine (Demerol[R]) Illegal injected opioids 68 (33) * Heroin * Other opiates Prescription drugs 41 (20) * Benzodiazapines * Muscle relaxants * Sleeping pills * Antidepressants Table 5.
Diazepam (commonly known as Valium) is not as you stated an antidepressant; it belongs to the group of drugs classified as benzodiazapines which are in fact tranquillisers.
While many such drugs can be inappropriate for older persons, the greatest potential for damage lies in receipt of long acting, high dose benzodiazapines. These have been associated with falls and hospitalization for hip fracture, but, depending on the facility, may only represent a minority of all anti-anxiety/hypnotic use.
Although most dislocations are anterior, they may also be posterior, lateral, or superior.(7) The problem is most commonly seen in those in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life, but it has previously been described in children under the age of 10 years and patients as old as 79.(5) Patients with a tendency toward mandible subluxation may experience dislocation during procedures such as bronchoscopy and endoscopy.(8) These are not truly spontaneous dislocations in that protective reflexes have been disabled with medications, such as morphine or benzodiazapines.