benzodiazepine

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benzodiazepine

 [ben″zo-di-az´ĕ-pēn]
any of a group of drugs having a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological activities, including antianxiety, muscle relaxing, and sedative and hypnotic effects. The group includes the sedative-hypnotics chlordiazepoxide (librium), clorazepate (tranxene), diazepam (valium), flurazepam (dalmane), and oxazepam (serax), which are used as antianxiety agents; and clonazepam (klonopin), an anticonvulsant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn),
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (for example, diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

benzodiazepine

(bĕn′zō-dī-ăz′ə-pēn′, -pĭn)
n.
Any of a group of chemical compounds with a common molecular structure and similar pharmacological effects, used as antianxiety agents, muscle relaxants, sedatives, hypnotics, and sometimes as anticonvulsants.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics.
 
Effects
Sedation, hypnosis, reduced motor activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsive.
 
Adverse effects
Physical and psychological dependence.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

benzodiazepine

Pharmacology A class of widely prescribed and often overdosed sedative-hypnotics Effects Sedation, hypnotic, ↓ activity, muscle relaxation, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant Adverse effects Physical and psychological dependence
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
1. Parent compound for the synthesis of a number of psychoactive compounds (e.g., diazepam, chlordiazepoxide).
2. A class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Benzodiazepine

A class of drugs that have a hypnotic and sedative action, used mainly as tranquilizers to control symptoms of anxiety.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ben·zo·di·az·e·pine

(ben'zō-dī-az'ĕ-pēn)
Class of compounds with antianxiety, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant properties.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
At the end of the day, if enough industries are affected by this, eventually we're going to see some sort of solution or at least a conversation around the issue," Benzo said.
When dealing with prolonged withdrawal syndrome, there is limited evidence in terms of the chronic neuroplastic changes that occur with benzo dependency regarding recovery of receptors and biochemistry homeostasis.
* The benzo diazepam - once called valium - is the most commonly prescribed controlled drug in Britain.
A Compassion of the Tumurs induced by Coaltar and Benzo (a) pyrene in a 2-year Bioassay, Carcinogenesis: 19, pp.
The outlook revision reflects a significant improvement in Benzo ChemA[cent sign]a'[not sign]a"[cent sign]s operating performance on the back of strong revenue growth, improvement in its operating margin, and increase in its net cash accruals in fiscal 2009/10, ended on 31 March 2010.
It's a disgrace that this so-called second city has no 'benzo' treatment.
She told a drugs workshop in Edinburgh she believed youngsters were seduced by trendy brand names such as Annihilation and Benzo Fury.
A girl of 19 and a man, 20, were also taken to hospital from the festival and police are probing claims they took a legal high called Benzo Fury.
The BAF for the three locations (Table 5) indicated that values for phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo(a) anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b) fluoranthene, benzo(k) fluoranthene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and benzo (g,h,l) perylene were higher than 1.
There are an estimated 1.5m prescribed benzo users in the UK and a further 200,000 illicit users, who buy them on the black market.