phenol

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phenol

 [fe´nol]
1. an extremely poisonous compound, used in dilute solution as an antimicrobial, anesthetic, and antipruritic. Ingestion or absorption through the skin causes symptoms including colic, local irritation, corrosion, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, shock, and respiratory arrest. Phenol should be properly labeled and stored to avoid accidental poisoning. Called also carbolic acid.
2. any of various related organic compounds containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic carbon ring.
phenol coefficient a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. The activity of the compound is expressed as the ratio of dilution in which it kills in 10 minutes but not in 5 minutes under the specified conditions. It can be determined in the absence of organic matter, or in the presence of a standard amount of added organic matter.

phe·nol

(fē'nol),
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant; locally escharotic in concentrated form and neurolytic in 3-4% solutions; internally, a powerful escharotic poison.

phenol

(fē′nôl′, -nōl′, -nŏl′)
n.
1. A caustic, poisonous, white crystalline compound, C6H6O, derived from benzene and used in resins, plastics, and pharmaceuticals and in dilute form as a disinfectant and antiseptic. Also called carbolic acid.
2. Any of a class of aromatic organic compounds having at least one hydroxyl group attached directly to the benzene ring.

phenol

Nutrition Phenolics A simple cyclic compound with a hydroxyl group on an aromatic ring–eg, tyrosine; phenols are concentrated in fruits–grapes/raisins, garlic, onions, green tea, and may protect against cardiovascular disease, CA, possibly viruses Toxicology Carbolic acid, hydroxybenzene, phenyl hydrate A toxic crystalline compound, with a hydroxyl group on a benzene ring; phenol was once used as a topical anesthetic, antiseptic, and antipruritic

phenol

carbolic acid, C6H5OH, which has been used as an antiseptic and DISINFECTANT because of its antimicrobial activity. However, it irritates the skin and so is rarely used for such purposes nowadays. Derivatives of phenol, called phenolics, contain a molecule of phenol that has been altered chemically to reduce its ability to irritate and/or to increase its antimicrobial activity. Phenolics act by damaging PLASMA MEMBRANES, inactivating ENZYMES and denaturing PROTEINS (see DENATURATION). Phenolics include cresols, which are good surface disinfectants, and hexachlorophene, which is used to control NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS.

phe·nol

(fē'nol)
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant.