Agrostis

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Related to Bentgrasses: creeping bentgrass

Agrostis

grass in the plant family Poaceae. Includes A. avenacea (blowaway, blown, fairy or oat grass).

Agrostis avenacea
+ Anguina agrostis (A. funesta) + Clavibacter toxicus those grass seed heads which are infested with a nematode produce galls containing the bacteria which produce a toxin tunicamyluracil (corynetoxin), the cause of flood plain staggers.
References in periodicals archive ?
colonial and dryland bentgrasses explained [greater than or equal to] 98% of the variance among species in both 2001 experiments (Table 2).
Thus, colonial and dryland bentgrasses are more closely related to each other than to creeping bentgrass.
Hosts include the bentgrasses, annual bluegrass, fine fescues, perennial ryegrass, and bermudagrass.
All cool season grasses and bermudagrass are attacked, but the bentgrasses, annual bluegrass, tall fescue, and perennial ryegrass exhibit the greatest susceptibility.
1] for the bentgrasses, annual bluegrasses, and unplanted control, respectively) and then decreased to [approximately equal to] 3 and 10 mg [L.
In the summer, both creeping and velvet bentgrasses irrigated at 80% ETa maintained quality levels equivalent to those at 100% ETa.
Bentgrasses used in this study represented seven groups: Milwaukee, Seed Research of Oregon (SRO), Azores, Plant Introductions (PI), Velvet, Creeping, and Colonial (Table 1).
Further research is required to increase our understanding of the role of trichomes in disease resistance and determine the specific resistance mechanism used by creeping bentgrasses that poses resistance to S.
Our recent work in the study of genetic diversity in the Agrostis species with AFLPs has shown the advantage of this technique for biodiversity studies, distinguishing fourteen species of bentgrasses into seven major groups (Vergara and Bughrara, 2003).
Investigations at the molecular level may provide a clearer understanding of the diversity and relationships in bentgrasses.
Yamamoto and Duich (1994) also found difficulty in distinguishing colonial and dryland bentgrasses using isozymes.