benign

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benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the major glands there were 134 benign tumours (67%) and 66 malignant tumours (33%) with Pleomorphic adenoma being the commonest benign tumour constituting 118 cases (88.05%) out of 134 benign tumours.
The main problem with the situation is that, patients present either with advanced malignancy or with some sort of complication in benign tumours.1
In benign tumours, the TTP in central vessels was reduced (p=0.008), but there was no significant change in the other variables relative to normal breast.
Most benign tumours were cystic in consistency (93.4%) and malignant tumours were hard in consistency (40.5%) and around 23.8% of malignant tumours have a variable consistency.
Leiomyoma of the bladder is a benign mesenchymal tumour of the bladder.1 It's a very rare benign tumour which constitutes 0.43% of the entire bladder growths.2
Germ cell tumours (GCTs) comprise the second largest group in our study in which benign tumours dominated the malignant ones (48 vs 07 /55).
Benign tumours mainly included nevus, squamous papilloma, angiomas, seborrhoeic keratosis and also cases of carcinoma in situ.
The accuracy of the test in ovarian neoplasms exclusively was 86.6%, whereas it had a sensitivity of 72.7%, specificity 94.7%, PPV 88.8% and NPV 85.7% for benign tumours /conditions and malignant tumours.
The male: female ratio for benign tumours was almost equal.
"We are seeing the doctor next week to talk about getting Bethany on the drug." Bethany suffers up to 50 seizures a day and has benign tumours on her brain, liver and kidney due to Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.
Endobronchial lipomas are rare benign tumours of the lung.
Peak incidence of most of the benign tumours is in the fourth and the fifth decade and malignant is in the sixth and the seventh decade.