BeneFin

BeneFin

A commercial product made from shark cartilage, which claimed to be effective in treating arthritis, psoriasis and malignancies (including breast cancer, prostate cancer and Kaposi sarcoma) based on questionable data which suggested that shark cartilage has anti-angiogenic properties. The FDA concluded that shark cartilage was ineffective, and if the purveyors continued making fraudulent claims of efficacy they would be sent to jail.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benefin Conductivity Bromacil Hardness (2004-only) Captan HC[O.
Commonly used preemergence chemicals include benefin, bensulide, dithiopyr, metolachlor, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, prodiamine, and siduron.
Lane founded LaneLabs-USA, with his son Andrew as president, and began marketing BeneFin.
Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, told FAMILY PRACTICE NEWS that this product is quite different from BeneFin.
Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, told INTERNAL MEDICINE NEWS that this product is quite different from BeneFin.
William Lane's son, to sell BeneFin, a shark-cartilage product.
Much of that promotion also has been deemed illegal by federal agencies, which have recently been moving against some of these products, including BeneFin, as unapproved drugs marketed under the guise of dietary supplements.
Two companies charged by the Federal Trade Commission with making false and unsubstantiated claims for BeneFin shark cartilage supplements have agreed to settle.
1] active ingredient of benefin (N-butyl-N-ethyl-[Alpha],[Alpha],[Alpha]-trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-p-toluidine) for preplant weed control.
Purchasers of BeneJoint topical cream receive a $2 in-pack coupon for BeneFin tablets, and BeneFin purchasers receive a buy-one-get-one-free in-pack coupon for Bene Joint.
Other available brands include Benefin, Basic Organics, and KAL.
Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against Lane Labs-USA, the makers of BeneFin shark cartilage supplement, for promoting and marketing shark cartilage as a treatment for cancer without sufficient evidence.