Bendectin


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Bendectin

An antinausea drug withdrawn from the market in 1983 by its manufacturer because of its alleged teratogenicity.
References in periodicals archive ?
supra note 36, at 200-01 (discussing the Bendectin litigation).
Green, Expert Witnesses and Sufficiency of Evidence in Toxic Substances Litigation: The Legacy of Agent Orange and Bendectin Litigation, 86 Nw.
Again in the 1980's, Bendectin (doxylamine plus pyridoxine) was removed from distribution in the US by the pharmaceutical company because of concern associated with birth defects and associated litigations (Koren, Pastuszak, & Ito, 1998).
market by the manufacturer in 1983 because the company couldn't afford the high cost of litigation and insurance, despite the fact that a panel convened by the Food and Drug Administration said there was no association between Bendectin and human birth defects.
118) The jurors interviewed in Sanders' study (who seem to have made a factually wrong decision, because it is unlikely that Bendectin was the cause) did not seem to accept (or apparently appreciate) the relative strength of the epidemiological evidence and the significance of the secular trend data.
The signal example of this is Bendectin (pyroxidine HCl/doxylamine succinate), a drug approved by FDA in 1956 to prevent nausea during pregnancy.
Consider also the US mass tort litigation concerning Bendectin (Debendox), the anti-nausea drug used in pregnancy.
Partial tallies of the number of mass toxic tort claimants indicate 210,000 claimants with Daikon Shield-related claims; 190,000 with asbestos claims against Manville; 150,000 with other asbestos claims; 125,000 with Agent Orange claims; and over 1000 apiece with claims related to DES or Bendectin.
Bendectin, the combination of doxylamine and pyridoxine (also in combination with dicyclomine until 1978), was used as an antiemetic by more than 33 million pregnant women in the United States and throughout the world for nearly 3 decades.
3) Controversy surrounded mass tort litigation involving the morning sickness drug Bendectin, silicone gel breast implants, and the herbicide Agent Orange, among other products and substances.
The children and their parents sued in state court alleging their mothers' ingestion of Bendectin, a prescription drug marketed by Merrell Dow, caused their defects.