Bence Jones protein

(redirected from Bence-Jones Proteins)

Bence Jones protein

An abnormal 22–24-kD monoclonal of light-chain—usually kappa, less commonly, lambda—immunoglobulin derived from the clonal expansion(s) of plasma cells, which is found in the urine of 50–80% of patients with multiple myeloma and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. Bence-Jones protein is small enough to be excreted by the kidney.

Specimen
24-hour urine.
 
Comments
False-positive results can occur in connective tissue disease, renal insufficiency and in other malignancies. Immunofixation electrophoresis—or more recently, serum-free light-chain assay—is the preferred method for detecting BJPs. The heat detection method—Bence Jones reaction (see there)—has fallen into disuse.

Bence Jones protein

An abnormal dimer of light-chain Ig derived from the clonal expansion of plasma cells, found in the urine of 50-80% of Pts with myeloma and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia; these proteins are small enough to be excreted by the kidney

Bence Jones protein

A MONOCLONAL immunoglobulin formed in excess by B lymphocytes and found in the serum and urine in cases of MYELOMATOSIS. (Henry Bence Jones, 1818–1873, English physician).

Bence Jones protein

Small protein, composed of a light chain of immunoglobulin, made by plasma cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Light chain deposition disease or Bence-Jones myeloma is a progressive disease characterized by proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow and overproduction of light chain immunoglobulins (Bence-Jones proteins) in plasma and urine [2].
Free light chains are also produced along with intact proteins; these light chains are detected by urine protein electrophoresis and are designated as Bence-Jones proteins. Excess cytokines activate osteoclasts, leading to bone destruction and subsequently to discrete lytic lesions or diffuse osteopenia.
Bataille and Sany critria,1 for SPB include an isolated tumor composed a clonal proliferation of plasma cells; absence of lesions on skeletal radiographic survey; absence of plasmacytosis in the bone marrow; and absence of anemia, Bence-Jones proteins in urine or hypercalcemia.
Because of increased immunoglobulins, the ESR is high: >20 mm/hour in 85% and >100 in one third.10 Elevated creatinine is seen in 50% and hypercalcemia in 25%.10 Urinalysis is typically negative (Bence-Jones proteins are not detected by dipstick) unless there is amyloidosis or light chain deposition disease leading to albuminuria.
Recently, however, he had had a relapse, developing increased levels of Bence-Jones proteins in the urine as well as plasma cell infiltration and decreased kidney function.
The nature of Bence-Jones proteins: chemical similarities to polypeptide chains of myeloma globulins and normal gamma- globulins.
Serum electrophoresis for paraproteinaemia confirmed a free lambda light-chain band in the gamma-region with a kappa/lambda ratio of 0.06; urine electrophoresis demonstrated Bence-Jones proteins.
These would include: (1) no histologic evidence of plasmacytoma/plasmacytosis in bone marrow; (2) negative blood investigations and no clinical signs and symptoms of myeloma (e.g., bone pain, anemia, renal failure); and (3) no urine monoclonal gammopathy (Bence-Jones proteins) or osteolytic lesions on plain films.
Turbidimetric measurement of Bence-Jones proteins using antibodies against free light chains of immunoglobulins.
Bence-Jones proteins and light chains of immunoglobulins (first of two parts).
Urine protein electrophoresis was negative for Bence-Jones proteins. A bone marrow aspirate was notable for a 45% plasmacytosis.
The incidence and possible relevance of Bence-Jones protein in the sera of patients with multiple myeloma.