Bence Jones protein


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Bence Jones protein

An abnormal 22–24-kD monoclonal of light-chain—usually kappa, less commonly, lambda—immunoglobulin derived from the clonal expansion(s) of plasma cells, which is found in the urine of 50–80% of patients with multiple myeloma and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. Bence-Jones protein is small enough to be excreted by the kidney.

Specimen
24-hour urine.
 
Comments
False-positive results can occur in connective tissue disease, renal insufficiency and in other malignancies. Immunofixation electrophoresis—or more recently, serum-free light-chain assay—is the preferred method for detecting BJPs. The heat detection method—Bence Jones reaction (see there)—has fallen into disuse.

Bence Jones protein

An abnormal dimer of light-chain Ig derived from the clonal expansion of plasma cells, found in the urine of 50-80% of Pts with myeloma and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia; these proteins are small enough to be excreted by the kidney

Bence Jones protein

A MONOCLONAL immunoglobulin formed in excess by B lymphocytes and found in the serum and urine in cases of MYELOMATOSIS. (Henry Bence Jones, 1818–1873, English physician).

Bence Jones protein

Small protein, composed of a light chain of immunoglobulin, made by plasma cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bence Jones proteinuria, found in 60% or more of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and less often in patients with other B-cell--derived malignancies, such as solitary plasmacytoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia,[1] is serially monitored quantitatively both for its prognostic value and as an indicator of treatment response.[1-3] Renal tubular dysfunction, most likely due to a number of factors including the nephrotoxicity of Bence Jones proteins themselves,[1,4] is a common complication of long-standing MM.
Bence Jones proteins [monoclonal free immunoglobulin light chains (FLCs)] are important tumor markers for identifying and managing patients with monoclonal plasma cell diseases, particularly multiple myeloma.
Also, urine should be sent for protein electrophoresis to look for Bence Jones proteins. A bone marrow biopsy should be performed for histologic analysis.
Serum free light chains: an alternative to the urine Bence Jones proteins screening test for monoclonal gammopathies.
Findings on bone marrow biopsy were normal, as were the results of immunologic laboratory analysis, including an assay of Bence Jones proteins. Skeletal roentgenography revealed large diploetic vein canals in the skull, but no osteolytic areas.
Serum free light chains: an alternative test to urine Bence Jones proteins when screening for monoclonal gammopathies.
Bence Jones proteins in urine and serum were also negative for myeloma.
Nephrotoxic potential of Bence Jones proteins. N Engl J Med 1991;324:1845-51.
Bence Jones proteins and light chains of immunoglobulins.
The study of "free" light chains (Bence Jones proteins) has been rekindled by the report by Fischer et al.