Belmont report

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Belmont report

A national commission that promulgated the basic ethical guidelines and principles for human research in the U.S.
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Another thorny question is how to extend the protections of the individual that were codified in the Belmont principles to the community.
Are the Belmont principles adequate to address the new facets of research that are entailed in community-engaged research?
To guide such an adaptation, I introduce three research methodologies (1)--decolonizing, participatory, and feminist--that specialize in work with underserved populations, as these approaches have a tradition of modifying the Belmont principles for community work.
However, several research ethics scholars have suggested that the Belmont principles are ill-suited to community-based research, especially as the concepts are currently applied by Institutional Review Boards (Brydon-Miller & Greenwood, 2006; Shore, 2007; Tuhiwai Smith, 1999).
To modify these important Belmont Principles, I draw from decolonial, feminist, and participatory research methodologies.
Together, these three research methodologies can help us adapt the Belmont principles to ensure the ethical practice of service-learning.
Yet respecting community partners, in the fuller sense of the word, lays the groundwork for a deeper application of all of the Belmont principles.
There is some truth to this, though it must be recalled that one of the basic Belmont principles of bioethics is justice.
Richman discusses the duties of a physician or other health care provider in terms of the so-called Belmont Principles of 'autonomy' and 'beneficence'.
In essence, the discernment of justice in human research leads one back flail circle to the Belmont principles of respect for persons and beneficence.
It is also well known that the Belmont principles were created at the urging of the state, and enacted as regulations, with the help of Kennedy Institute members who were simultaneously writing Principles of Biomedical Ethics.[22] The original Congressional mandate to the National Commission included the command to "identify the ethical principles which should underlie the conduct of biomedical and behavioral research with human subjects and develop guidelines that should be followed in such research."[23] Jonsen later concluded that the principles, which had become part of public law, had "met the need of public-policy makers for a clear and simple statement of the ethical basis for regulation of research."[24]
[22.] While the Belmont principles were created simultaneously with Beauchamp and Childress's textbook, it seems clear that the textbook would not have had the influence it did if it had not articulated what would soon become the legally mandated system in human research.