belay

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belay

(bĕ-lāy′)
To protect with a rope. A rescuer can belay a stokes basket as it is being lowered to a safe position.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different locations offer different routes up the mountain, and depending on the difficulty levels the members of the group want to try (and the amount of belayers), several people can climb at the same time.
Again, a belayer supports them from below, but if the climber slips they fall to their previous spot versus being immediately "caught" by a taut rope.
Using this method of belaying is not overly reliable and can cause a lot of harm to both the climber and the belayer. But with help from the right device, a person of modest size and strength can safely protect the largest of climbers from a fall.
* "On belay?"--the climber is asking the belayer if the rope is tied in.
One activity, tree-climbing - complete with ropes, harnesses and trained belayers - reigned as the most popular.
Now that I've learned how to tie in, belay, and climb, Lazzeri sets me loose to find a buddy so we can take turns as belayer and climber.
When the belayer came to ascend the ropes he would hang out in space about 20 metres from the rock face with a 700-metre drop below and look around with the helmet-cam.
For example, has the belayer test been successfully completed and documented?
A belayer (the person who helps secure you with a rope and supervises your climb) double checks the equipment.
Aid climbing (see box) in these temperatures is painfully slow; it takes all day for the lead climber to ascend just 30 to 60 metres, by which time the supporting belayer is semi-hypothermic and normally unwilling to climb.
The "belayer" secures the rope through a metal disc (attached to his harness) called a "belay plate" and only issues a small amount of rope to the leader at a time, thus minimizing the distance the leader would fall if she slipped.
Members receive a free belay lesson (belayers are the person on the ground who controls the safety ropes for a climber); each rate comes with shoes and the chalk bag.