Beighton score


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Related to Beighton score: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Beighton score

; Beighton-Carter-Wilson (BCW) score scoring system to delineate joint hypermobility; each positive result is awarded one point; BCW score is expressed as x /9 (Table 1)
Table 1: The Beighton score of joint hypermobility
One point is awarded for each positive result in each test and aggregated, giving a score of x/9
TestScore awarded for positive result
Metacarpophalangeal joint hyperextension to 90°/>90°+ 1 right
+ 1 left
Hyperflexion of wrist (i.e. ability to touch medial (ulnar) forearm with thumb)+ 1 right
+ 1 left
Elbow hyperextension >10°+ 1 right
+ 1 left
Knee joint hyperextension >10°+ 1 right
+ 1 left
Hyperflexion of hips (i.e. ability to touch toes and place palms flat on floor with knee joints fully extended)+1
Maximum score9
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon dividing the students as "present" and "absent" as per previous trauma history, no statistically significant difference was detected in both groups in terms of Beighton score and frequency of tender points.
The correlation between age, number of tender points, frequency of performing exercise, BMI, and Beighton score of participants was studied.
Student's t-test was used for comparing parametric data, such as age, body mass index (BMI), and ROM, whereas the Mann-Whitney U test was utilized for comparing the duration of symptoms, pain scores, and Beighton scores.
Moreover, the total Beighton scores were significantly higher in the SIS group than the AC group (p<0.
12 Determining the Beighton score is essential for making the diagnosis of joint hypermobility and is calculated by doing simple manoeuvres.
There was no correlation between Beighton score and biometric indices of hiatal size or pelvic organ mobility in that study.
The Beighton score runs from 0 to 9, based on the number of hypermobile joints in an evaluation of both thumbs, both little fingers, both elbows, both knees, and the trunk.
Moreover, the participants also had similar clinical findings, except for the balance tests and Beighton scores.
McCormack and colleagues' study of Royal Ballet School students used the Beighton score and the Brighton criteria to identify GJH and JHS respectively.
The data, examined by variance analysis, included anthropometric variables, the Beighton score, and clinical features constituting BJHS.
7% of the boys were found to have ligamentous laxity based upon a positive Beighton score.