hypermobility

(redirected from Beighton score)
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Related to Beighton score: Marfan syndrome, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

hy·per·mo·bil·i·ty

(hī'pĕr-mō-bil'i-tē),
Increased range of movement of joints, and joint laxity, occurring normally in children and adolescents or as a result of disease, for example, Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

hypermobility

Instability Orthopedics Any motion occurring in a joint in response to the reactive force of gravity at a time when that joint should be stable under such a load; hypermobility is often misused to describe extra movement as seen in a contortionist.

Hypermobility

Unusual flexibility of the joints, allowing them to be bent or moved beyond their normal range of motion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 2: Joint hypermobility: passive apposition of the thumb to forearm and passive dorsal hyperextension of the metacarpophalangeal joint >90[degrees] (Beighton score: questions 1 and 2).
Upon dividing the students as "present" and "absent" as per previous trauma history, no statistically significant difference was detected in both groups in terms of Beighton score and frequency of tender points.
Student's t-test was used for comparing parametric data, such as age, body mass index (BMI), and ROM, whereas the Mann-Whitney U test was utilized for comparing the duration of symptoms, pain scores, and Beighton scores. Furthermore, a chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for comparing the categorical variables.
POP was defined as stage Greater than 2.12 Determining the Beighton score is essential for making the diagnosis of joint hypermobility and is calculated by doing simple manoeuvres.
The Beighton score runs from 0 to 9, based on the number of hypermobile joints in an evaluation of both thumbs, both little fingers, both elbows, both knees, and the trunk.
Additionally, the Beighton score was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (p <- 0.001) and group 3 (p <- 0.001), but it differed between groups 1 and 3 (p=0.375) (Table 1).
One helpful tool is the Beighton score, which assigns one point for each elbow and knee that can extend more than 10 degrees, one point for each thumb that can be apposed to the flexor surface of the forearm, one point for each fifth finger that can be dorsiflexed more than 90 degrees, and one point for placing the palms on the floor with the knees straight.
Gannon and Bird's comparative study of gymnasts and dancers found that the dancers had the higher mean Beighton score, 4.36/9, followed by gymnasts at 3.7/9.
This condition has been around since 1946, defined by doctors such as Peter Byers, Victor McKusick, and Peter Beighton (yes, the same doctor who created the "Beighton score" mentioned in your article).
The Beighton score identifies symptoms such as the ability to passively dor-siflex the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint to 90 degrees or more, to oppose the thumb to the volar aspect of the ipsilateral forearm, or to place the hands flat on the floor without bending the knees.
The Beighton score identifies symptoms such as the ability to passively dorsiflex the fifth metacarpophalangeal joint to 90 degrees or more, to oppose the thumb to the volar aspect of the ipsilateral forearm, or to place the hands flat on the floor without bending the knees.