behavioural ecology

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behavioural ecology

the aspect of the study of ECOLOGY having regard to how NATURAL SELECTION might affect behaviour.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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Yreka, CA, August 09, 2019 --(PR.com)-- A recently completed 5-year intensive close-range observational study has unveiled new insights into wild horse behavioral ecology in the wilderness.
He employs central place foraging and exchange theory, subsets of human behavioral ecology, to interpret the large data set.
5 with "Nourishment: What Animals Can Teach Us About Rediscovering Our Nutritional Wisdom," by Fred Provenza, professor emeritus of Behavioral Ecology at Utah State University Department of Wildland Resources.
The study, from the journal Behavioral Ecology, published by Oxford University Press, evaluated the relationship between fish behavior and coral performance using a farmerfish-coral system.
In terms of behavioral ecology, it is this great mystery," Stafford said. "Bowhead whales do this behavior in the winter, during 24-hour darkness of the polar winter, in 95 to 100 per cent sea ice cover.
Del-Claro, "Social parasitism: Emergence of the cuckoo strategy between pseudoscorpions," Behavioral Ecology, vol.
Those just-in-case tail flags could tell a still-hidden snake that this is one wary squirrel ready for extreme body displacement, Clark and Breanna Putman report in an upcoming Behavioral Ecology. Earlier work showed that frequent flaggers often escaped attacks.
Understanding how these competing factors generate diversity in social systems is a major goal of behavioral ecology, but one that has been hampered by a lack of basic data quantifying many aspects of social structure and associations.
Human Nature and the Evolution of Society uses psychology, sociobiology and human behavioral ecology to explore social life in society and considers everything from parenthood and kinship to social violence, using case study examples from around the world and throughout human and animal societies.
Editors Sherman (neurobiology and behavior, Cornell U.) and Alcock (behavioral ecology, Arizona State U.) present this anthology of articles regarding animal behavior, collected from the magazine American Scientist.
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