behavioural ecology

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behavioural ecology

the aspect of the study of ECOLOGY having regard to how NATURAL SELECTION might affect behaviour.
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Using a behavioral ecology framework, the HARVEST project explores fundamental questions: Why did hominins choose to eat certain plants What were their foraging goals We will focus on two objectives: 1) Reconstructing the diets of fossil hominins and 2) Exploring the costs and benefits of plant foods.
uk/research/news/how-humans-and-wild-birds-collaborate-to-get-precious-resources-of-honey-and-wax) Cambridge University , an evolutionary biologist who specializes in bird behavioral ecology in Africa who was lead author of the paper, said: "What's remarkable about the honeyguide-human relationship is that it involves free-living wild animals whose interactions with humans have probably evolved through natural selection, probably over the course of hundreds of thousands of years.
Those just-in-case tail flags could tell a still-hidden snake that this is one wary squirrel ready for extreme body displacement, Clark and Breanna Putman report in an upcoming Behavioral Ecology.
Understanding how these competing factors generate diversity in social systems is a major goal of behavioral ecology, but one that has been hampered by a lack of basic data quantifying many aspects of social structure and associations.
Human Nature and the Evolution of Society uses psychology, sociobiology and human behavioral ecology to explore social life in society and considers everything from parenthood and kinship to social violence, using case study examples from around the world and throughout human and animal societies.
The study is published in the journal Behavioral Ecology.
After the introduction (Part I), the units follow a logical order that starts at the level of the individual (Part II: behavioral ecology, including social insects) and progressively expand to larger scales.
A recent study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology posits that the surging human population is starting to organize like an ant supercolony.
The research was published in the journal Behavioral Ecology.
In May of 2004, the field of entomology and more specifically the fields of ethology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, and integrated pest management unexpectedly lost a pioneering and leading scientist and colleague, Ronald J.
Crozier also served in various capacities on editorial boards for several major journals including Annual Review of Ecology & Systematics, Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology, Ecology Letters, Evolution, Insectes Sociaux, Journal of Molecular Evolution, and Molecular Biology & Evolution.
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