behavior modification

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behavior

 [be-hāv´yer]
the observable responses, actions, or activities of someone. adj., adj behav´ioral.
adaptive behavior behavior that fosters effective or successful individual interaction with the environment.
contingent behavior actions that are dependent upon a specific stimulus.
behavior disorder a general concept referring to any type of behavioral abnormality that is functional in origin.
disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant.
health seeking b's see health seeking behaviors.
behavior modification
1. an approach to correction of undesirable conduct that focuses on changing observable actions. Modification of the behavior is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be changed. The principles and techniques of this method have been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also conditioning.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of a behavior change.
behavior modification (omaha) on the second level of the intervention scheme of the omaha system, a target definition defined as activities designed to promote a change of habits.
behavior modification: social skills in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting the patient to develop or improve interpersonal social skills.
readiness for enhanced organized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as a pattern of modulation of the physiologic and behavioral systems of functioning (autonomic, motor, state-organizational, self-regulatory, and attentional-interactional systems) in an infant, which is satisfactory but can be improved, resulting in higher levels of integration in response to environmental stimuli.
risk for disorganized infant behavior a nursing diagnosis defined as the risk for alteration in integration and modulation of the physiological and behavioral systems of functioning in an infant; see also disorganized infant behavior.
behavior therapy a therapeutic approach in which the focus is on the patient's observable behavior, rather than on conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie his maladaptive behavior. This is accomplished through systematic manipulation of the environmental and behavioral variables related to the specific behavior to be modified; operant conditioning, systematic desensitization, token economy, aversive control, flooding, and implosion are examples of techniques that may be used in behavior therapy. Studies of classical and operant conditioning form the basis of behavior therapy, which has been used in treatment of both physical and mental disorders, such as alcoholism, smoking, obesity, and stress. See also behavior modification.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·hav·ior ther·a·py

a therapy based on the concept that physical rather than mental events control overt behavior; such behavior is analyzed and selected behavior is then modified using specific techniques focusing on stimuli, conditioning, and learning, so as to improve health and functioning. See: systematic desensitization, conditioning, learning.
See also: cognitive therapy. Compare: psychotherapy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

behavior modification

n.
1. The application of learning techniques such as conditioning, biofeedback, reinforcement, or aversion therapy in order to change a person's behavior.

behavior modifier n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

be·hav·ior mod·i·fi·ca·tion

(bē-hāv'yŏr mod'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. A systematic treatment technique that attempts to change a person's habitual maladaptive response by creating rewards for a new, desired response or unrewarding outcomes for the habitual response; intended to teach certain skills or to extinguish undesirable behaviors, attitudes, or phobias.
2. A psychological theory based on observation of behavior and operant principles of behavior change.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Behavior modification

A form of therapy that uses rewards to reinforce desired behavior. An example would be to give a child a piece of chocolate for grooming themselves appropriately.
Mentioned in: Bed-Wetting, Mutism
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·hav·ior mod·i·fi·ca·tion

(bē-hāv'yŏr mod'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. A systematic treatment technique that attempts to change a person's habitual maladaptive response by creating rewards for a new desired response or unrewarding outcomes for the habitual response; intended to teach certain skills or to extinguish undesirable behaviors, attitudes, or phobias.
2. A psychological theory based on observation of behavior and operant principles of behavior change.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about behavior modification

Q. What is cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of depression? What is it all about? Please explain? Could someone who has actually had this explain what it is all about. I don't want to get a copy and paste answer from a web page somewhere, just a simple explanation in plain simple terms that I could relate to.

A. You mention "for example thoughts of worthlessness"

Could anyone identify other examples of these types of thoughts?

I struggle the most with guilt and shame.

Others:
What others think of me being a recovering alcoholic, someone who has depression, having a son who has been in a penitentiary several times.
---

What can anyone really do about these thoughts anyway. I have not come up with anything that works except to offer them all back up to God and let them all go.

What else could a professional come up that is any better than that? I would really like to know. Otherwise, what good would it really do?

More discussions about behavior modification
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