colony collapse disorder

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Related to Bee deaths: Colony Collapse Disorder

colony collapse disorder

n.
A condition chiefly affecting the hives of domesticated honeybees, characterized by the sudden disappearance and death of so many worker bees that the colony cannot be maintained.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activists attribute bee deaths to a widely used class of pesticides called neonicotinoids.
The department's investigation found that Mischkot sprayed a pesticide containing the active ingredient imidacloprid on the grounds of the apartment complex in June, including on 17 linden trees - the same tree species at which there were mass bee death incidents elsewhere in Oregon last year.
Parise also told the Vermont Beekeeper Association that he expected more bee deaths this year because of the wild temperature swings.
in 2012 and 2013 found bee deaths were higher in heavy corn production areas where neonicotinoids are used.
EU member states in March failed to agree to ban three widely used pesticides linked to bee deaths. Thirteen EU governments were in favor of the ban, nine voted against, and five others--including Britain and Germany --abstained.
WHILE I welcome the European Commission's recent decision to restrict the use of pesticides linked to bee deaths, many of my constituents will be dismayed that it was not backed by the UK government.
| SIR - While I welcome the European Commission's recent decision to restrict the use of pesticides linked to bee deaths, many of my constituents in South-East Wales, who support the ban, will be dismayed that it was not backed by the UK government.
WHILST I welcome the European Commission's recent decision to restrict the use of pesticides linked to bee deaths, many of my constituents across the north, who are amongst those supporting the ban, will be dismayed that it was not backed by the UK government.
It now appears that for ten years Bayer CropScience, a subsidiary of the German chemical giant Bayer, had suppressed information indicating that a class of pesticides (which beekeepers and growers had suspected all along) was indeed associated with bee deaths.
Researchers at the University of Leeds are beginning a three-year project to try to discover the possible causes of a recent increase in bee deaths around the world.
FRUITLESS FALL tells the larger story of why bees are key to our lives--and provides a wide-ranging story of beekeeping methods, cause of bee deaths, common myths, and the solutions to keeping bee populations healthy.
Beekeepers began seeing huge losses in their bee colonies last fall, with bee deaths of from more than 50 percent to between 80 and 90 percent.