sediment

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Related to Bedload: dissolved load, Suspended load

sediment

 [sed´ĭ-ment]
a precipitate, especially that formed spontaneously.

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt),
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis. Synonym(s): sedimentum
2. To cause or effect the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in centrifugation or ultracentrifugation. Synonym(s): sedimentate
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit, as in the case of centrifugation or ultracentrifugation.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]

sed·i·ment

(sed'i-mĕnt)
1. Insoluble material that tends to sink to the bottom of a liquid, as in hypostasis.
2. To cause the formation of a sediment or deposit.
Synonym(s): sedimentate.
[L. sedimentum, a settling, fr. sedeo, to sit, settle down]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mixed-load rivers transport fine suspended sediment as well as significant bedload and the former accumulate occasionally thick enough overbank fines to enhance bank stability (Bluck, 1971; Collinson, 1996).
The dataset of bedload sediment fluxes (Table 4) is quite limited.
y Troendle C.A., "Defining phases of bedload transport using piecewise regression", Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 27, (2002) 971-990.
As expected from the measurement of bedload transport rates (see Figure 2) the stability test ST-3 which applied to the bed formed by antecedent flow AF-3 indicated lower critical shear stresses for all grain sizes than that of stability test ST-6 which applied to the bed formed by antecedent flow AF-6.
M aximum [[U.sup.3].sub.b] decreased the strength of the experimental effects, probably by increasing the purely passive transport of juveniles with sediment bedload and thus obliterating patterns in the distribution of juvenile bivalves relative to adult Macomona.
Effects on bedload transport of experimental removal of woody debris from a forest gravel-bed stream.
Although other factors, such as bedload size and bedload transport, can affect river form (Mangelsdorf et al.
This shape prevents ascension of the near-bed flow, and as a consequence reduces the quantities of bedload particles encountering the siphons.
The two-bin machine described here holds one level bedload from a half-ton pickup truck in each compartment.
As the river flows, this bottom sediment, called bedload, scrapes over the rocks like sandpaper over wood, slowly eroding (wearing away) the riverbed to carve the canyon.
Garcia, "Using Lagrangian particle saltation observations for bedload sediment transport modelling," Hydrological Processes, vol.
The required works will include channel excavation, bedload and large woody debris removal, bank resloping, rock placement, ditch construction, debris deflector installation, and revegetation.