Beau's line

Beau's line

(bōz)
n.
Transverse depressions on the fingernails occurring after trauma such as severe febrile disease, malnutrition, or coronary occlusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our patient was characterized by erythroderma with large scales, no Beau's line, and pathological lack of eosinophils.
Four patients (2.7%) each had complete pigmentation of nail plate, nail plate thickening and beau's line. Median canalicular dystrophy of Heller, onychomycosis and focal onycholysis were seen in 3 (2%) patients each.
The most common nail finding observed was melanonychia [Figure 3], which was seen in 74 (37%) patients followed by onychoschizia [Figure 4], Muehrcke's lines, Mees' lines and Beau's lines.
It can be thought of as more severe form of Beau's lines, in which the nail itself actually breaks and separates from the proximal nail plate and eventually sheds.
Chemotherapy may produce Beau's lines. Pulse therapy with corticosteroids can also produce dark bands on the nail.
However, horizontal indentions in the nails, or Beau's lines as they are called, result from recent bodily trauma or high fever and/or indicate a vitamin deficiency or unchecked illness, such as diabetes or heart disease.
The patient remains in complete remission with a follow-up of 6 months and the Beau's lines of his nail plate have disappeared completely.
One condition, Beau's lines, is characterized by indentations across the nail bed that are a sign of disrupted growth due to illness.
TABLE Nail changes linked to nutrition deficits and toxins (9) Nail change Associated with Beau's lines (transverse Zinc deficiency depressions of all the nails) Diffuse white nail Zinc deficiency, anemia Koilonychia (concave nails) Iron deficiency Diffuse brown, black, or Malnutrition white bands Diffuse brown nail Photographic developer Variable white Hyopcalcemia, thallium toxicity (rat poison) Muehrcke's lines (transverse, Hypoalbuminemia stationary, paired white bands) Mee's lines (transverse white Arsenic bands) Longitudinal pigmentation [B.sub.12] or folate deficiency
(1) Multiple Beau's lines or shoreline nails are also known to occur in leprosy as well as with reactions.
Horizontal nail ridges WHAT IT COULD MEAN: Known as Beau's lines, these ridges appear when nail growth is interrupted by injury or severe illness, like uncontrolled diabetes or a virus accompanied by a high fever, such as mumps.