Baylisascaris procyonis

Bay·lis·as·ca·ris pro·cy·on·is

a large roundworm commonly found in raccoons; has been the cause of human visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, following accidental ingestion of embryonated Baylisascaris procyonis eggs in feces of infected raccoons.
See also: visceral larva migrans.

Baylisascaris procyonis

An intestinal parasite of raccoons, the eggs of which may be ingested by humans and 50 other species of mammals, hatch in the intestines and migrate through organs and muscles.
 
Clinical findings
Skin irritation, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly and fever due to larval migration, nausea, lethargy, incoordination, blindness, encephalitis, blindness, death.
 
Prognosis
Poor, profound neurologic impairment, partial paralysis, cotical blindness, developmental delay, etc.

Management
Deworming; possibly albendazole.

Baylisascaris procyonis

Raccoon roundworm Parasitology An intestinal parasite of raccoons, the eggs of which may be ingested by humans, hatch in the intestine and migrate through organs and muscles Clinical Nausea, fatigue, hepatomegaly, loss of muscle coordination, blindness, encephalitis, death Management Possibly, albendazole Prognosis Poor, profound neurologic impairment, partial paralysis, cortical blindness, developmental delay, etc

Baylisascaris procyonis

(bal?i-sas'ka-ris pro?se-on'is, se'on-is) [L. procyon, raccoon fr. Gr.]
The raccoon roundworm. Accidental consumption of roundworm eggs (such as by children who put contaminated soil in their mouths) can result in encephalitis. Synonym: raccoon ascaris
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common and significant pathogen carried by raccoons would be the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis. The eggs from this roundworm stay viable in the environment for a long time.
Abnormalities of Baylisascaris procyonis eggs shed by experimentally inoculated dogs and raccoons, visualized on fecal flotation.
On May 1, 2017, in Washington, Public Health--Seattle & King County (PHSKC) was notified of a possible Baylisascaris procyonis infection in a previously healthy male child aged 19 months.
2012; Parsons, et al., 2013), such as raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) and rabies (Houle et al, 2011; Smyser el al., 2013).
I want to pass along a report from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer about raccoons being a host for the roundworm parasite known as Baylisascaris procyonis.
Key words: Procyon lotor, Didelphis virginiana, Mephitis mephitis, Arthrocephalus lotoris, Baylisascaris procyonis, Capillaria plica, Mesocestoides, Oochoristica, Physaloptera maxillaris, Physaloptera turgida, Plagiorchis elegans, Plagiorhynchus cylindraceus, helminth parasites, Nebraska
Their large population sizes and ubiquitous distribution make raccoons an important vector for parasites and diseases including distemper, rabies, and the roundworm Baylisascaris procyonis (Mitchell et al.
In spring of 2009, two cases of Baylisascaris procyonis were reported to the New York City Health Department.
This disease is caused by a parasite, a roundworm called Baylisascaris procyonis. The roundworm larvae cause problems as they travel through the person's muscles and various organs, including the liver, brain, lungs, and eyes.
Raccoons also carry diseases like rabies, distemper and Baylisascaris procyonis (round worms that, when transferred to another animal such as a dog or human, may cause blindness, central nervous system damage and even death).