Bauhin


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Bau·hin

(bō'an[h]),
Gaspard, Swiss anatomist, 1560-1624. See: Bauhin gland, Bauhin valve.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Botanists prior to Species Plantarum also used the binomial, such as Caspar Bauhin and Leonhart Fuchs.
After identification of the cecal pole, the mobile colon ascending and transversum were mobilized out of the peritoneal cavity with the help of a DeBakey atraumatic forceps in order to allow for the unequivocal identification of the future colostomy position in the ascending colon (5 mm distal from Bauhin's valve, proximal colostomy (PC)) and the transverse colon (20 mm distal from the Bauhin's valve, distal colostomy (DC)).
It is the primary accessory ossicle of the foot and was first described by Bauhin in 1605.
After midline laparotomy, IIP surgery was performed in 9 animals by isolating a 10 cm ileal segment 5 cm oral to Bauhin's valve.
Caspar Bauhin then drew on Platter's list of distinguishing features in his Anatomica virilis et muliebris historia (1597), while in his Theatrum anatomicum (1605), Bauhin copied Platter's image to illustrate mulieris sceleton (Stolberg 279).
But the pinnacle of the bezoar's presence in European naturalist literature came some years later at the hand of another great naturalist, Caspar Bauhin (1560-1624).
Intraoperative examination revealed a distended the loops of small intestine filled with bloody fluid; a tumor was situated in a half distance between the ligament of Treitz and Bauhin. The enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes (about 6cm in size) were detected.
Laparoscopic exploration of the abdomen showed a whitish saucer-shaped ileal mass located close to Bauhin's valve and capping the inflammatory ileo-caecum (Fig.
For example, in the preface of his book Plumier lists some works he had consulted on the nature of South America and the Caribbean, whose authors include Gaspard Bauhin, Leonhard Fuchs, Gonzalo Oviedo, Jean Baptiste du Tertre, Jose (Christophorus) Acosta, Piso, and Marcgrave (Plumier, 1693).