battered wife syndrome

(redirected from Battered person syndrome)
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A general term for a constellation of signs and symptoms that are typical of a woman (wife/common-law partner/girlfriend) who is physically abused by a husband/common-law partner/boyfriend

battered wife syndrome

Public health A general term for a constellation of signs and symptoms that are typical of a ♀ wife/common-law partner who is physically abused by a husband/boyfriend. See Domestic violence, Spousal abuse. Cf Superbowl syndrome.
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1992) (stating evidence of battered person syndrome was admissible to explain the defendant's action).
Consider "black rage" defense (Colin Ferguson murdered six people on the Long Island Railroad); "battered person syndrome" (he killed his stepfather for abusing his mother); "chronic lateness syndrome" (a school superintendent killed his boss for terminating employment for being constantly late for work); and the "twinkie defense syndrome (Dan White was found guilty of manslaughter, not first-degree murder, for killing Harvey Milk.
An illustrative example is the statutory definition of "battered person syndrome" proposed but not introduced in Washington and modeled closely on an enacted Missouri provision:
"Battered person syndrome" means a group of concurrent psychological and behavioral characteristics resulting from repeated victimization by family violence or threat of family violence, including: (a) An extreme level of anxiety or depression;
(15) Some current statutes and proposed legislation refer to "battered person syndrome." See infra text accompanying notes 263-64.
(211) Many of these changes, discussed infra text accompanying notes 257-84, provide special evidentiary standards for defendants accused of homicides that occur in the context of family violence and refer to "battered person syndrome." Another proposed evidentiary rule change, Act of Oct.
The Missouri legislature subsequently changed its definition to "battered person syndrome." See MO.