Batesian mimicry


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Batesian mimicry

(bāt′sē-ən)
n.
A form of protective mimicry, especially in insects, in which a species that is palatable or harmless closely resembles an unpalatable or harmful species and therefore is avoided by predators.

Batesian mimicry

see MIMICRY.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nur, "Evolutionary rates of models and mimics in Batesian mimicry," The American Naturalist, vol.
In Batesian mimicry, the mimic (Pholidichthys leucotaenia) may be quite abundant throughout its distribution if the model (Plotosus lineatus) is extremely venomous and therefore unpalatable, or if the mimic is unimportant as prey (Randall 2005).
This species, like promethea, has very dark males suggesting Batesian mimicry. Similarly, other silk moth species with diurnal mating, such as Eupackaria calleta, which calls and mates from ca.
If the leg I movement is a means ofpicking up chemical cues we would expect it to be much more random than if it is really a Batesian mimicry trait.
In scientific circles this idea--an edible species benefiting by imitating a noxious one--is known as Batesian mimicry. It's named after Henry Bates, a mid-1800s naturalist who roamed Brazilian forests collecting butterflies.
The theory of Batesian mimicry holds that edible species that look like dangerous species will be protected, because predators evolve to avoid dangerous species--even without previous, real-life, bad dining experiences.
Batesian mimicry (Bates 1862), where palatable prey resembles unpalatable (or otherwise unprofitable) and conspicuous prey, differs from any other prey-predator dynamic (Endler 1991).
Gilbert (2005) and Stevens (2007) commented on "imperfect mimicry," citing the possibility that it may be an adaptation to combine camouflage with some level of Batesian mimicry should concealment fail; it is not known whether any of the mimic octopuses are toxic.
That means clicking works both as Mullerian mimicry (two unpalatable species benefiting by making similar sounds that predators can learn by catching either one) and Batesian mimicry (edible prey borrowing an "unpalatable" signal), says Barber.
For Myrmarachne, the resemblance to the ant model appears to function primarily as Batesian mimicry. Myrmarachne's mimicry of an aggressive model puts these salticids in a difficult situation.