basidiobolomycosis

entomophthoromycosis

 
any disease in humans or other animals caused by fungi of the order entomophthorales; human infections usually occur in apparently physiologically and immunologically normal individuals, although opportunistic infections also occur.
entomophthoromycosis basidio´bolae a chronic infection caused by Basidiobolus ranarum, in which gradually enlarging granulomas form in the subcutaneous tissues of the arms, chest, and trunk. Multiple purulent ulcers may develop; seen in children and adolescents in tropical areas of Indonesia, India, and Africa. Called also basidiobolomycosis.
entomophthoromycosis conidio´bolae infection by Conidiobolus coronatus, a form of zygomycosis usually involving the nose and paranasal sinuses (rhinoentomophthoromycosis). Sometimes, especially in weak or immunocompromised patients, it can spread to the central nervous system and cause fatal rhinocerebral zygomycosis.

basidiobolomycosis

An infection with a zygomycetous mould fungus, Basidiobolus haptosporus . This is seen mainly in children in Africa and Indonesia. There are localized, hard, woody swellings under the skin. The condition responds to treatment with potassium iodide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Basidiobolomycosis develops in the subcutaneous soft tissue and yet can involve muscles and surrounding organs, as well as gastrointestinal lesions [16,17].
Basidiobolomycosis can be mistaken for Buruli ulcer (BU), an infectious skin disease due to Mycobacterium ulcerans, also endemic in some countries in Africa, Asia, South America, Mexico, and Australia, which presents as a painless papule, nodule, plaque, edema, or ulcer.
However the histopathological examination of the tissue samples after Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) and Gomori- Methenamine-Silver (GMS) staining provided strong support for the diagnosis of basidiobolomycosis. PCR for the detection ofB.
Basidiobolomycosis is a rare childhood mycosis which preferentially affects rural young people in tropical countries mainly in Africa, Asia, and Latin America [1-5].
We report a second case of basidiobolomycosis simulating a Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in a Togolese young boy living in a rural area.
This case confirms the efficacy of azole derivatives in the treatment of basidiobolomycosis. We treated our patient with ketoconazole at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day, with good progress after 6 months.
Ahmed said that his daughter suffers from a rare illness (Basidiobolomycosis) - a mysterious fungal infection which mimics small intestinal and colonic tumor - requiring a speedy treatment.
Basidiobolomycosis is a rare disease caused by the fungus Basidiobolus ranarum, an environmental saprophyte found worldwide.
Features were suggestive of colonic basidiobolomycosis. No evidence of malignancy was seen.
Prior to 1995, only six cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis had been reported in the literature: one in Florida, one in Nigeria, and four in Brazil.
In March 1999, the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) notified CDC about six cases of gastrointestinal basidiobolomycosis (GIB), an invasive fungal infection.
On the basis of histologic examination, basidiobolomycosis was diagnosed and she received antifungal therapy with itraconazole.