science

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sci·ence

(sī'ents),
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]

science

/sci·ence/ (si´ens)
1. the systematic observation of natural phenomena for the purpose of discovering laws governing those phenomena.
2. the body of knowledge accumulated by such means.scientif´ic

science

(sī′əns)
n.
1.
a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena: new advances in science and technology.
b. Such activities restricted to a class of natural phenomena: the science of astronomy.
2. A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area: the science of marketing.

science

[sī′əns]
Etymology: L, scientia, knowledge
a systematic attempt to establish theories to explain observed phenomena and the knowledge obtained through these efforts. Pure science is concerned with the gathering of information solely for the sake of obtaining new knowledge. Applied science is the practical application of scientific theory and laws. See also hypothesis, law, scientific method, theory.

science

Vox populi The formal and systematic study of natural phenomena. See Big science, Fraud in science, Little science, Junk science, Misconduct in science, Prediction science, Pseudoscience.

sci·ence

(sī'ĕns)
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretic explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations.
2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to explaining a limited class of phenomena.
[L. scientia, knowledge, fr. scio, to know]
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