emotion

(redirected from Basic emotions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

emotion

 [e-mo´shun]
a state of arousal characterized by alteration of feeling tone and by physiologic behavioral changes. The external manifestation of emotion is called affect; a pervasive and sustained emotional state, mood. adj., adj emo´tional. The physical form of emotion may be outward and evident to others, as in crying, laughing, blushing, or a variety of facial expressions. However, emotion is not always reflected in one's appearance and actions even though psychic changes are taking place. Joy, grief, fear, and anger are examples of emotions.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn),
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object and is evidenced in both behavior and in psychological changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

emotion

(ĭ-mō′shən)
n.
1. A mental state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort and is often accompanied by physiological changes; a feeling: the emotions of joy, sorrow, and anger.
2. Such mental states or the qualities that are associated with them, especially in contrast to reason: a decision based on emotion rather than logic.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

emotion

Psychology A mood, affect or feeling of any kind–eg, anger, excitement, fear, grief, joy, hatred, love. See Negative emotion, Positive emotion, Toxic emotion.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest directed toward a definite object and evidenced in both behavior and in psychologic changes, with accompanying autonomic nervous system manifestations.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

emotion

Any state of arousal in response to external events or memories of such events that affect, or threaten to affect, personal advantage. Emotion is never purely mental but is always associated with bodily changes such as the secretion of ADRENALINE and cortisol and their effects. The limbic system and the hypothalamus of the brain are the mediators of emotional expression and feeling. The external expression of emotional content is known as ‘affect’. Repressed emotions are associated with psychosomatic disease. The most important, in this context, are anger, a sense of dependency, and fear.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

e·mo·tion

(ē-mō'shŭn)
A strong feeling, aroused mental state, or intense state of drive or unrest, which may be directed toward a definite object.
[L. e-moveo, pp. -motus, to move out, agitate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about emotion

Q. Emotions My 68 years-old husband underwent his surgery for lung cancer several moths ago and after that received chemo. Thankfully, it seems that he’s on the right track, but then lately he’s being very emotional. He says he’s always been this way since the diagnosis, but he just hid it. We try to talk about it, but it seems we just don’t communicate. Any advice?

A. Hi,
Those above me already phrased very well what I wanted to write, so I’ll add a link to a site I found about this subject:
http://www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/MBC_4x_Anxiety.asp?sitearea=MBC

Take care!

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

Q. discussing my father situation with the doctor My 82 years old dad has dementia, and currently lives with us at my home. For the last few weeks he's very nervous and sometimes yells and screams at us. I want to take him to the doctor and see if he can get any help, but I'm afraid that if I'll try to speak with doctor about this subject in front of my dad he'll take offense. What can I do? Thank you very much!

A. The answer above is a good suggestion. I would add to the letter a small warning about the way your father would react to a discussion of his behaviour so the doctor would know to discuss it carefully.

More discussions about emotion
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Positive and Negative Emotions in Experienced by Patients with Epilepsy Healthcare Encounters Type of Emotion Basic Emotion Complex Positive emotion Hope Joy Security Relief Negative emotion Despair Anger Fear Indignation Unrest Resignation Sadness Type of Emotion Self-Evaluating Emotion Positive emotion Courage Importance Pride Trustworthiness Human value Negative emotion Guilt Self-doubt Shame Insignificance
The findings come in line with previous research, which showed that facial expressions of these basic emotions are recognised across a wide range of cultures.
"Basic Emotions, Natural Kinds, Emotion Schemas, and a New Paradigm." Perspectives on Psychological Science 2 (3): 260-80.
For example in 2010, Radbound Facial Database (RaFD) was developed by Langner,Dotsch, Bijlstra, Wigboldus, Hawk, and Van Knippenberg The distinctive feature of this set was that it consisted of 7 basic emotions of adult as well as child models Photographs were obtained from five different angels.
Xia [2] studied four basic emotions: "relaxation," "pleasure," "movement," and "tension." Yoshida et al.
In the discrete emotional model, several basic emotions are considered separately since they do not have common attributes.
Thus, fear and anger are two basic emotions at stressful events: fear is the scariness at the threat, while anger is trying to cope with the stressful situation [4].
Compared to controls, PD patients performed worse at recognizing all of the six basic emotions (except for disgust) and were judged to be less expressive for happiness, anger, and sadness, which was accompanied by a correlation of r = 0.48 between the ability to express and recognize the six basic emotions.
(4) showed that individuals with BPD who performed emotion recognition tasks presented alterations, such as subtle deficits in recognising basic emotions and response bias (i.e.
The main idea of this framework is to measure personality dimensions using personality test and to measure emotions from brain signals, then quantifying the correlation between personality dimensions and basic emotions primitives.
Scent receptors in the nose send chemical messages via the olfactory nerve to the limbic system - a primitive area of the brain that deals with basic emotions, including anger and fear, and memories.

Full browser ?