Barth

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Barth

(barth),
Jean B.P., Strasburg physician, 1806-1877. See: Barth hernia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Evangelicals dealt with science by walling off conclusions that conflicted with their religious beliefs; Barthians, postliberals, and neo-Kantians inoculated themselves from scientific refutation; Clayton was happy to be finished with cognitive bargaining and inoculation games: "It is our calling and our right to enter fully into the scientific project, either as scientists or in dialogue with scientists.
Unlike Barth, Radhakrishnan argued that every historical expression of religiosity is a valid, positive response to the ultimate reality; however, in a Barthian manner, though for very different reasons, Radhakrishnan also held that not all religions have attained the level of truth and goodness where they can lead their followers to the realization of the timeless Spirit.
Updike cites a line from Barth's "The Humanity of God" as one of the four epigraphs prefacing the novel: "What if the result of the new hymn to the majesty of God should be a new confirmation of the hopelessness of all human activity?" Critics typically read this epigraph as a condemnation of Dale's ambitious proposal, based on natural theology, and as an endorsement of Roger's Barthian position.
Barr provides an illuminating discussion of Barthian attitudes to natural reason, and explores the link between Barth's abhorrence of natural theology and his opposition to the German Christians.
As for the Barthian concept of "something and nothingness," as early as Rabbit, Run Harry states, "`Well I don't know all this about theology, but I'll tell you, I do feel, I guess, that somewhere behind all this ...
One does not have to be a Barthian to see that this question looms over especially Pannenberg's interpretation of the Resurrection.
One schema for charting the latter group begins in the early twentieth century with Karl Barth's revised commentary on The Epistle to the Romans (2) and traces its influence through the "postliberal" appropriation of Barthian hermeneutics as well as those theologians operating in conscious opposition to postliberal methods.
He takes up Niebuhr's realism about the persistence of sin in historical advances and his dialectical theology of history, affirms Hromadka's pastoral attention to the culture in which the church finds itself, while being wary of tendencies to uncritical endorsement of that culture; learns from Troeltsch's Case for the influence of religion on society; values Barth's focus on the divine transcendence, while reading him as more attentive to history than his critics aver; and hints at the useability of a Barthian "narrative theology" in the Japanese context.
He deals extensively with the work of James Gustafson, Gordon Kaufman, Sallie McFague, Peter Hodgson, George Lindbeck, and John Milbank in terms of five common threads: the Bible and modern critical methods, the role of human agency in revelation, suspicion of exclusivist salvation histories, the need for a theology of mediation, and the rebellion against a Barthian standard of neo-orthodoxy.
Tambaram blocked the issue through its "barthian" approach.
First, as Pentecostal theologian Macchia effectively argues, many Evangelicals and Protestants do not take pneumatology beyond the Barthian subordination of the Spirit to Christ or the dominant concern of modern Protestant theology with issues of epistemology and revelation.
(49) A Barthian scholar can no doubt explain what strikes me as contradiction.