barrier methods


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barrier

 [bar´e-er]
1. an obstruction.
2. a partition between two fluid compartments in the body.
3. a covering used to prevent contact with body fluids.
alveolar-capillary barrier (alveolocapillary barrier) see under membrane.
blood-air barrier alveolocapillary membrane.
blood-aqueous barrier the physiologic mechanism that prevents exchange of materials between the chambers of the eye and the blood.
blood-brain barrier see blood-brain barrier.
blood-gas barrier alveolocapillary membrane.
blood-testis barrier a barrier separating the blood from the seminiferous tubules, consisting of special junctional complexes between adjacent Sertoli cells near the base of the seminiferous epithelium.
barrier methods contraceptive methods such as condoms and diaphragms in which a plastic or rubber barrier blocks passage of spermatozoa through the vagina or cervix. See discussion under contraception.
placental barrier the tissue layers of the placenta which regulate the exchange of substances between the fetal and maternal circulation.

barrier methods

contraceptive methods, such as condoms and diaphragms, in which a plastic or rubber barrier blocks passage of spermatozoa through the vagina or cervix. See also contraception.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaler A, The female condom in North America: selling the technology of empowerment, Journal of Gender Studies, 2004, 139(2): 139-152; Kaler A, The future of female-controlled barrier methods for HIV prevention: female condoms and lessons learned, Culture, Health & Sexuality, 2004 (forthcoming); Hatzell T and Feldblum PJ, The female condom: beyond acceptability to public health impact, editorial, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2001, 28(11):655-657; and Warren M and Philpott A, Expanding safer sex options: introducing the female condom into national programmes, Reproductive Health Matters, 2003, 11(21):130139.
When used with a female mechanical barrier method (for example a cervical cap or diaphragm) N-9 is more effective than when used alone.
Women's responses to our open-ended question asking what they would change about the diaphragm have implications for the development of new female-controlled barrier methods that are similar to the diaphragm.
Latka M, Female-initiated barrier methods for the prevention of STI/HIV: where are we now?
Because male condoms were the most commonly used method among women having abortions and because problems associated with condom use are, in many ways, distinctly different from those of other barrier methods, we limited the analysis of potential reasons for pregnancy to women who had been using male condoms in the month they became pregnant.
Several new mechanical barrier methods are being designed to improve over the standard latex diaphragm, which Margaret Sanger introduced in the United States in 1916.
Recommendations for prevention of sexual transmission of Zika virus for couples in which one or both partners have traveled to or reside in an area with active Zika virus transmission Couples in which a woman is pregnant * Couples in which a woman is pregnant should use barrier methods against infection consistently and correctly or abstain from sex for the duration of the pregnancy.
The female condom is a female-initiated barrier method that offers potential for reducing the incidence of HIV, other STIs and unintended pregnancy.
Though male condoms are known to be a protective measure, people are still ignorant of the female condom which is the only woman-initiated barrier methods and its benefits.
04% in non RTI/STI group being aware about the importance of barrier methods to prevent infection.
Barrier methods are less effective than hormonal methods but cause fewer side effects and are associated with less risk.
18,19) The routine use of adhesion barrier methods, suggested by some authors, (20) needs to be validated in large trials and is therefore not routine practice in our unit.