barrier contraceptive


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Related to barrier contraceptive: Barrier methods

bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

a mechanical device designed to prevent spermatozoa from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent, that is, vaginal diaphragm.

bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

(bar'ē-ĕr kon-tră-sep'tiv)
A mechanical device designed to prevent sperms from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent.

barrier contraceptive

Any contraceptive, such as a condom or a diaphragm shield, that imposes a barrier between the spermatozoa and the ovum. See also CONTRACEPTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proportion of barrier contraceptive users who reported not always using their method ranged from 8% to 14%.
She continued, "CerMed's second product under development is CerCap[TM] HIV, a barrier contraceptive cervical cap which reduces the risk of infection from HIV.
Among women who did not use a barrier contraceptive, neither the duration of cohabitation nor the frequency of sexual exposure to sperm affected preeclampsia risk.
Barrier contraceptives and sexually transmitted diseases in women: a comparison of female-dependent methods and condoms, American Journal of Public Health, 1992, 82(5):669-674.
Lea's Shield: a study of the safety and efficacy of a new vaginal barrier contraceptive used with and without spermicide, Contraception, 1996, 53(6):329-335.
These barrier contraceptives require a prescription and initial fitting by a health care professional.
Women should begin using barrier contraceptives immediately after using emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy until normal menses resumes.
The NWHN's female condom advocacy was critical, Pearson explained, in "prodding FDA to require clinical trials in the first place, educating FDA about the usefulness of a barrier device with less than perfect effectiveness and coming to consensus with the contraceptive development community about a new FDA guidance for clinical trials of barrier contraceptives.
Using barrier contraceptives and other less effective methods is associated with an increased likelihood that women will experience at least a monthlong gap in protection during a year.
Pope Benedict asked senior Catholic figures to examine the use of barrier contraceptives after his election last year.
Some cases of non-menstrual toxic shock syndrome have been reported in women using barrier contraceptives, including Today Sponge, the diaphragm, and the cervical cap.