barrier contraceptive

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bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

a mechanical device designed to prevent spermatozoa from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent, that is, vaginal diaphragm.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bar·ri·er con·tra·cep·tive

(bar'ē-ĕr kon-tră-sep'tiv)
A mechanical device designed to prevent sperms from penetrating the cervical os; usually used in combination with a spermicidal agent.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

barrier contraceptive

Any contraceptive, such as a condom or a diaphragm shield, that imposes a barrier between the spermatozoa and the ovum. See also CONTRACEPTION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
- The woman needs to abstain from sexual intercourse or use barrier contraception for the next 7 days after starting or resuming regular contraception or until her next menses, whichever comes first.
Usage of barrier contraception do prevent many of the sexually transmitted diseases including infection of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus), which is a known contributor to cervical carcinoma.
For women who desire nonhormonal contraceptive and menopausal symptom management, a copper lUD, barrier contraception, or sterilization of the patient or her partner can be used in combination with a nonhormonal medication to manage vasomotor symptoms.
For women who desire nonhormonal contraceptive and menopausal symptom management, a copper IUD, barrier contraception, or sterilization of the patient or her partner can be used in combination with a nonhormonal medication to manage vasomotor symptoms.
And if you're not using barrier contraception, make sure you both get tested for sexually transmitted infections first.
On the horizon are "exciting possibilities" for new products in barrier contraception that are both spermicidal and microbicidal to prevent sexually transmitted infections, plus "a whole range of new IUDs, a 1-year vaginal ring with a new progestin, and other products," Dr.
This finding suggests that barrier contraception has some role in preventing recurrent vaginitis.
prolonged exposure of the female immune system to paternal antigens following intercourse (without barrier contraception) [could induce] tolerance of the maternal immune system to the paternal antigens.
In addition to emergency contraception, it provides recommendations on hormonal contraception (oral contraceptive pills, depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate, estrogen-progestin patches, vaginal ring, and levonorgestrel intrauterine), barrier contraception, intrauterine devices, surgical methods for contraception, and pregnancy termination.
A randomized trial of clinician-delivered interventions promoting barrier contraception for sexually transmitted disease prevention.
(1.) Artz L et al., A randomized trial of clinician-delivered interventions promoting barrier contraception for sexually transmitted disease prevention, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2005, 32(11):672-679.
To stay 100% safe the message is not to have sex, but if you're going to make sure you keep your wits about you, use barrier contraception and don't ignore worrying symptoms.