Barker hypothesis

Barker hypothesis

The proposition that a baby's nourishment in utero and during infancy determines the subsequent development of risk factors such as high blood pressure, blood clotting biochemistry and glucose intolerance and is thus a major determinant of coronary heart disease later in life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high incidence of premature and small for gestational age (SGA) births in developing countries as a risk factor for kidney disease in adulthood, in the absence of evident kidney disease in early life, has been explained by the Barker hypothesis.
His theory about how nutrition and growth before birth may affect cardiovascular health later on, as well as other adult chronic diseases and conditions, became known as the Barker Hypothesis.
The paper is the first summary of prehistoric evidence for the Barker hypothesis - the idea that many adult diseases originate during fetal development and early childhood.
Moore looked at obesity trends through the lens of the Barker Hypothesis, which got us thinking more than 3 decades ago about the role of intrauterine environment in short- and long-term health of offspring.
This proposal grew out of the Barker hypothesis which evolved into the Thrifty Phenotype hypothesis.
Some of these may have a direct influence on embryonic development, whereas others may exert their effects later in life, as predicted by the Barker hypothesis (Barker 1990).
Therefore, I am very pleased that this month's Master Class is devoted to a discussion of how the Barker hypothesis applies today.
Key words: Barker hypothesis, chlorpyrifos, cholesterol, diabetes mellitus type 2, insulin, organophosphates, triglycerides.
Both maternal obesity and gestational diabetes get at the heart of the Barker hypothesis, albeit a twist, in that excessive maternal adiposity and associated insulin resistance results in high maternal blood glucose, transferring excessive nutrients to the fetus.
At the 2003 Mount Sinai Conference on Early Environmental Origins of Neurological Degeneration, we explored the plausibility of extending the Barker hypothesis to encompass brain development and to explore the impacts of toxic chemicals on brain development.
PD could be "programmed" in utero according to the Barker hypothesis for chronic diseases (Kuh and Ben-Shlomo 1997), and aging may be only a period where there is a second hit or an interaction with other processes.