bark

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bark

(bark),
1. The envelope or covering of the roots, trunk, and branches of plants. Barks of pharmacologic significance not listed below are alphabetized under specific names.
2. Synonym(s): cinchona

bark

(bahrk) the rind or outer cortical cover of the woody parts of a plant, tree, or shrub.
cramp bark  the dried bark of Viburnum opulus, the high bush or cranberry tree; it has been used as an antispasmodic, uterine sedative, and antiscorbutic.
elm bark , slippery elm bark the dried inner bark of the slippery elm, Ulmus rubra, which is mucilaginous and demulcent.
white willow bark  a preparation of the bark of various Salix species collectively known as white willow, containing salicin, a precursor of salicylic acid; used as an antiinflammatory and antipyretic.
yohimbe bark  a preparation of the bark of Pausinystalia yohimbe, used for the same indications as yohimbine hydrochloride; it has also been used traditionally as an aphrodisiac and for skin diseases and obesity.

bark

Botany
The outer covering of trees and some plants, which consists of a cuticle (epidermis), outer bark (cortex) and inner bark (fibre).
 
Herbal medicine
(1) China, see there.
(2) Cinchona, see there; Cinchona species.
 
Veterinary medicine
The harsh sound uttered by a dog.

bark

the outer, living part of a woody stem, consisting of three layers:
  1. an inner layer called secondary PHLOEM, containing the elements of primary phloem plus horizontal ray cells which function in transporting materials across the stem.
  2. a middle layer of cork CAMBIUM, a group of meristematic (dividing) cells originating in the PARENCHYMA cells of the outer stem cortex. As the cells divide, the outer ones develop into cork cells and the inner ones give rise to parenchyma-like tissue.
  3. CORK, an outer region of cells forming a waterproof and protective layer broken only by LENTICELS.

bark

1. the voice of the dog.
2. the outer covering of a tree.

bark eating
a form of pica often indicative of boredom, nutritional deficiency of fiber or behavioral problem.
bark suppression
References in periodicals archive ?
Tabell I Oversikt over sub-tema og tema Sub-tema Tema Utfordringer i relasjoner Moralske utfordringer Utfordringer knyttet til A vaere [much less than] mellom barken formelle regler og veden [much greater than] Emosjonelle utfordringer Faglige utfordringer Samarbeidsutfordringer
Barken will be presenting on the topic of Project Finance for Renewable Energy as well as moderating two sessions on the subject.
Barken used noscapine to treat a handful of prostate cancer patients before retiring from clinical practice.
A San Diego State University accounting alumnus (class of '99) and former Beta Alpha Psi chapter vice president of communications, Barken was nominated by the SDSU chapter based on his renowned leadership in carbon accounting, IT auditing, internal controls testing and passion for the implementation of green technologies.
As an IT Practice Leader at Haskell & White, one of Southern California's largest independently owned accounting, auditing and tax consulting firms, Barken is a recognized leader in carbon accounting, IT auditing and internal controls testing.
We intend to expand free wireless access across San Diego," said Barken, who, in addition to his volunteer work with SoCalFreeNet, is co-director of the STAR Center at San Diego State University (http://starcenter.
Lee Barken, CISSP, CCNA, MCP, CPA has been in the IT industry since 1987.
It's an interesting move," comments MOBILE BUSINESS ADVISOR Technical Editor Lee Barken.
Lee Barken, CISSP, CCNA, MCP, has been in the IT industry since 1987.
Lee Barken, CCNA, MCP, has more than 15 years of experience in the IT industry.
For example, in this issue, Lee Barken explores whether you should provide wireless Internet access to the public and/or your customers.
Pioneering minimalist composer Steve Reich (1936-) was fascinated by hocketing and canonic figures; the sacred music of Arvo Part (1935-) frequently barkens back specifically to the raw, open harmonies of late-medieval church music; George Crumb (1929-) wrote actual madrigals (albeit in a modern style) in the 1960s.