barefoot doctor

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barefoot doctor

n.
A lay health care worker, especially in rural China, trained to perform tasks such as providing first aid, assisting in childbirth, and dispensing drugs.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A term once used in mainland China for country health-aides who were neither barefoot nor doctors. Most were farmers who received minimal basic medical and paramedical training and worked in rural villages bringing largely preventive health care services to rural areas where urban-trained doctors would not settle
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

barefoot doctor

A practitioner of traditional or native medicine in the People's Republic of China. Although barefoot doctors have not attended medical school, they are trained in the use of traditional Chinese therapies (e.g., the use of acupuncture and herbs), and in some Western therapies, such as first aid.
See also: doctor
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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References in periodicals archive ?
After the barefoot doctor was married into another village, no new barefoot doctors were trained to take her place before the CMS collapsed.
This improvement, according to author Xiaoping Fang, is attributed to the "barefoot doctor (chijiao yisheng) program"--a radical system of health-care delivery for the rural masses officially endorsed in 1968.
This concept of barefoot doctors was followed in other countries especially developing countries.
China's unique response was the now-famous 'Barefoot Doctors' program.
The Khmer Rouge regime appointed pet padevat ('revolutionary medics') inspired by the Chinese barefoot doctors to treat the rural poor.
Barefoot doctors or super speciaists, cash-free healthcare or private providers charging fat fees, a focus on lifestyle diseases or malaria and TB, obesity or malnutrition, primary care or top-class medical tourism -- our health system is constantly confronting these contradictory choices.
The modern resurgence of acupuncture is attributed to Chairman Mao, who needed an inexpensive health-care system and turned to the "barefoot doctors" of traditional Chinese medicine.
The 'Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution' came and went, as did communes and barefoot doctors, but Joseph Needham just went on and on.
An army of "barefoot doctors" fulfilled healthcare and disease prevention needs at a very basic level.
The "barefoot doctors" bring first aid to outlying villages.
My wife, Jan, and I first began to teach "barefoot doctors" from Myanmar in 1989, at the invitation of Daniel Kalnin, a member of Myanmar's Rawang ethnic group and director of Frontier Labourers for Christ.