barbiturate

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barbiturate

 [bahr-bich´er-it]
any of a class of sedative-hypnotic agents derived from barbituric acid or thiobarbituric acid and classified into long-, intermediate-, short-, and ultrashort-acting classes. The ultrashort-acting barbiturates, such as thiopental, are used as intravenous anesthetics. The long-acting barbiturate phenobarbital is an important anticonvulsant used in treatment of epilepsy. Barbiturates should not be used as a routine medication for anxiety or insomnia. In addition to numerous side effects, the risk of dependency is great. Barbiturates should be used only by the person for whom they have been prescribed. Abrupt withdrawal is associated with seizure activity.

Barbiturate poisoning was one of the most common methods of suicide in the industrialized world prior to the introduction of benzodiazepines. Barbiturate overdose is often fatal and should be treated with utmost promptness. If it occurs in the home, a poison control center should be contacted, as well as a health care provider and emergency services. The victim should be made to vomit (only if awake) and should be kept warm with breathing facilitated by proper positioning and removal of constricting clothing.

bar·bi·tu·rate

(bar-bich'ūr-āt), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation barbituate.
A derivative of barbituric acid (for example, phenobarbital) that act as CNS depressants and are used for their tranquilizing, hypnotic, and anti-seizure effects; most barbiturates have the potential for abuse.

barbiturate

(bär-bĭch′ər-ĭt, -ə-rāt′, bär-bĭch′ə-wĭt)
n.
Any of a group of barbituric acid derivatives that act as central nervous system depressants and are used as sedatives or hypnotics.

barbiturate

Any of a class of sedative/hypnotics derived from barbituric acid, which are divided based on their duration of action:
• Ultrashort—e.g., thiopental (Pentothal);
• Short and intermediate-acting—e.g., amobarbital (Amytal), pentobarbital (Nembutal), secobarbital (Seconal); or
• Long-acting—e.g., phenobarbital (Luminal), mephobarbital (Mebaral).

barbiturate

Downer Neuropharmacology Any sedative/hypnotic; they are derived from barbituric acid, are divided based on their duration of action into ultrashort, short, intermediate and long-acting–eg phenobarbital; barbiturates are the suicide drug of choice, or anticonvulsant, and among street drugs used as a 'downer'

bar·bi·tu·rate

(bahr-bich'ŭr-ăt)
Any of various derivatives of barbituric acid used as sedatives, hypnotics, and anticonvulsants.

barbiturate

any UREIDE such as phenobarbital, amytal, seconal, etc. Barbiturates have a depressant effect on the CNS, usually producing sleep.

Barbiturate

A drug with hypnotic and sedative effects.
Mentioned in: Anesthesia, General

bar·bi·tu·rate

(bahr-bich'ŭr-ăt) Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation barbituate.
Central nervous system depressant used for its tranquilizing, hypnotic, and antiseizure effects; most forms have potential for abuse.
References in periodicals archive ?
"If someone couldn't sleep, instead of giving them barbituates he gave them this stuff.
For example, measures associated with reductions in suicide rates without compensatory increases in the use of other methods include removal of carbon monoxide from domestic gas (7), limiting the size of prescriptions to barbituates and other drugs commonly used in self-poisonings (8), and restricting access to handguns (9).
Usually for barbituates this is a cellular change that occurs at the membrane level.
Urinalysis is able to detect hundreds of different drugs, but the drugs most commonly tested for include amphetamines, barbituates, cannabanoids, cocaine and PCP.
Alcohol, nicotine, (both substances are drugs, though generally not considered as such,) barbituates, antihistamines, antidepressives, beta-blockers, anti-hypertensives, cannabis (marijuana), vasoconstrictives, and some drugs prescribed for diabetes and stomach ulcers have all been reported as causing erectile dysfunction (ED) as a side effect.