Bankart lesion


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Related to Bankart lesion: Slap lesion

Bankart lesion

a tear of the anterior glenoid labrum accompanying detachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament from the glenoid margin.

Bankart lesion

An avulsion fracture of the anteroinferior glenoid labrum, often accompanied by an anterior dislocation of the humeral head; the detachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex from the inferior glenoid, accompanied by stretching of the remaining fibers, leads to shoulder laxity.

Bankart lesion

Orthopedics Shoulder instability due to detachment of the inferior glenohumeral ligament complex from the inferior glenoid, which is often accompanied by stretching of the remaining fibers, leading to shoulder laxity. See Position. Cf Beach chair position.

Ban·kart le·sion

(bangk'ărt lē'zhŭn)
Avulsion or damage to the anterior lip of the glenoid fossa when the humerus slides forward in an anterior dislocation.

Bankart,

Arthur S.B., English surgeon, 1876-1951.
Bankart dislocation
Bankart lesion - related to shoulder dislocation.
Bankart procedure - surgical repair of Bankart lesion.
Bankart reconstruction
Bankart repair
Bankart retractor
Bankart shoulder repair set
References in periodicals archive ?
Arm Abduction Provides a Better Reduction of the Bankart Lesion During Immobilization in External Rotation After an Initial Shoulder Dislocation.
Although injury mechanisms for traditional bony Bankart lesions are known, mechanisms that produce an everted bony fragment have not yet been elucidated.
In a review, Bui-Mansfield (6) found that 68% of patients presenting with HAGL's have associated injuries such as Hill-Sachs lesions (10%), Bankart lesions (22%), and most commonly, rotator cuff tears (27%)--particularly of the subscapularis muscle (13).
RESULTS: 40 Patients, each with unilateral Bankart lesion [Fig-1], were initially taken up for the study.
To evaluate the clinical results of minimally invasive modified Latarjet technique in recurrent, traumatic anterior shoulder instability associated with obvious Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions.
FIGURE 2A: Axial T2W 3D FFE image shows tear of anteroinferior labrum (white circle): Soft tissue Bankart lesion.
Secondary signs of labral tears include paralabral cysts (N), periosteal stripping and tearing, labral associated bone injuries such as Hill Sachs and Osseous Bankart lesions.
In a review of the literature, unaddressed capsular laxity and Bankart lesions (12) have been cited as the most common pathologies associated with continued instability after surgical stabilization procedures (Table 2).
The proposed mechanism of injury is a hyperabduction and external rotation force versus a hyperabduction and impaction force which would result in a Bankart lesion. (10) An axillary view of the shoulder joint is necessary to distinguish this lesion from a Bankart lesion.
Capsuloligamentous disruption may occur as an acute event, such as with a labral detachment (Bankart lesion), at the time of anterior shoulder dislocation or with repetitive injury and plastic deformation of the ligaments.
(5.) Hecker AT, Shea M, Hayhurst JO, Myers ER, Meeks LW, Hayes WC: Pull-out strength of suture anchors for rotator cuff and Bankart lesion repairs.