Banisteriopsis caapi


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Banisteriopsis caapi

A tropical vine indigenous to South America whose bark is boiled with other plants to make hallucinogenic drinks, such as ayahuasca, or yage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ayahuasca is an entheogenic brew made out of Banisteriopsis caapi vine and other ingredients.
Their goal: to partake in a brewed concoction made from a vine plant Banisteriopsis caapi, traditionally used by indigenous people for sacred religious ceremonies.
A necessidade que essas religioes tem de cultivar o cipo Banisteriopsis caapi, popularmente chamado de jagube ou mariri, e a folha Psychotria viridis, popularmente chamada de rainha ou chacrona, para o autoconsumo do cha Ayahuasca, bem como o reconhecimento por parte dessas instituicoes de que essas plantas precisam do ambiente florestal para um melhor desenvolvimento, estiveram no cerne desta pesquisa.
It is usually prepared by the prolonged concoction of the bark of the vine Banisteriopsis caapi together with the leaves of the shrub Psychotria viridis.
Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic tea that is most commonly comprised of the vine Banisteriopsis caapi alone or in combination with other plants such as Psychotria viridis [1].
Entre las plantas americanas con efecto psicoactivo se destacan Erythroxylum coca (coca), Banisteriopsis caapi (yaje o ayahuasca), Lophophora williamsii (peyote), Echinopsis lageniformis (achuma), Nicotiana tabacum (tabaco) Anadenanthera colubrina y A.
The Quechua term ayahuasca, common in Peru, Bolivia, Brazil and parts of Ecuador, is used to refer to decoctions of the liana Banisteriopsis caapi with the leaves of Psychotria viridis.
The main ingredient of this shamanic tea or brew is a vine called Banisteriopsis caapi.
Psychedelics have no medicinal value: Psychedelics, particularly natural drugs like mushrooms and ayahuasca, which is derived from boiled Banisteriopsis caapi (yage) and Psychotria Viridis (chacruna) vines, were used in ancient spiritual rituals, and to cure ailments and heal people long before modern day medicines filled pharmacy shelves.