bandwagon effect

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bandwagon effect

A type of herd mentality in which a belief or trend cascades and becomes increasingly popular as more people “climb on board” and subscribe to belief or trend, regardless of personal convictions and scant evidence the bandwagon’s validity; people often climb on bandwagon to be on the winning or popular side.

bandwagon effect

(band′wag″ŏn)
A method of making decisions based on people's perceptions of what others have decided whether or not they have made a thoughtful choice. It is decision making based on peer pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
This could be indirect proof of the fact that part of the group of PD switchers was affected by some sort of postelection bandwagon effect.
Possible misreporting due to the bandwagon effect thus impinges only marginally on our coefficients, and our substantive interpretations remain unaltered.
The bandwagon effect is not the only illustration of public opinion polls influencing the electoral process, but it is a common enough example that it seems appropriate to explore the relationship of Canadian federal election results with a portrait of the public mood at the beginning of each of those campaigns.
Caution is certainly advisable in drawing any conclusions from such a table, however if there was consistent evidence of a net bandwagon effect at the national level, one would expect to see a different pattern to the results.
Some would question whether the 1988 example, even if joined by the 1958 and 1984 cases really constitutes a systematic recurring bandwagon effect.
The evidence in Table 2 is somewhat mixed, but there is little consistent pattern to support the bandwagon effect.
Movies are globally appealing experience goods that are particularly prone to bandwagon effects (de Vany & Lee, 2001).
Aggregate bandwagon effects of popularity information on audiences' movie selections.
As a result, a bandwagon effect can occur, providing popular products a "big-gets-bigger" advantage (Fu & Sim, 2011).
The theory of information cascades refers mainly to the analysis of conforming behaviors on an aggregate level; the bandwagon effect is employed to explain the tendency of consumers to rely on the feedback of other consumers on an individual level (Simon, 1954).
Wolf's findings largely confirm the bandwagon effect originally detected by Fein's and Weaver's teams, and her detailed analysis contributes several original insights about the influence of CRM overlay technology and possible implications for the democratic process in a television-saturated media environment.
But even discounting any possible bandwagon effect of CRM overlays, the real-time Perception Analyzer graphs' subtle conveyance of interpretive cues to viewers of presidential debates has troubling implications.