bandwagon effect

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bandwagon effect

A type of herd mentality in which a belief or trend cascades and becomes increasingly popular as more people “climb on board” and subscribe to belief or trend, regardless of personal convictions and scant evidence the bandwagon’s validity; people often climb on bandwagon to be on the winning or popular side.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bandwagon effect

(band′wag″ŏn)
A method of making decisions based on people's perceptions of what others have decided whether or not they have made a thoughtful choice. It is decision making based on peer pressure.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
This could be indirect proof of the fact that part of the group of PD switchers was affected by some sort of postelection bandwagon effect. However, the coefficient of the circle of friends remains insignificant.
By removing respondents who switched to support the PD (to consider the bandwagon effect) from the analysis, the results remain the same, and we see a marginal rise in the statistical significance and the magnitude of the familial disagreement effect, as expected.
Apart from those works, there are other researchers who have been unable to corroborate a bandwagon effect in their inquiry.
The bandwagon effect is not the only illustration of public opinion polls influencing the electoral process, but it is a common enough example that it seems appropriate to explore the relationship of Canadian federal election results with a portrait of the public mood at the beginning of each of those campaigns.
Curiously, although his classic paper on the bandwagon effect, etc.
Consistent with this perspective, we examine here two possibilities: (1) that voting intentions are affected by expectations about the likely winner of the next general election (bandwagon effect) and (2) that expectations about which party will win the next election are dependent on current vote intentions (whether through a sophisticated treatment of information or a simple projection effect).
Of course, one should not overestimate the bandwagon effect either.
An individual's reliance on other users' product choices and evaluations has been shown to be related to bandwagon effects, or herd behavior, which describe the tendency of an individual to follow the behavior of previous users (Bikhchandani, Hirshleifer, & Welch, 1998; Simon, 1954).
A large body of research has found evidence on information cascades and subsequent bandwagon effects with respect to various objects, such as consumer goods, cultural products, and online information (for an overview, see Xu & Fu, 2014).
These study design features address both of Schill and Kirk's criticisms of earlier CRM overlay studies that found bandwagon effects.
51) This "bandwagon effect" was even more pronounced in a similar study of audience response to a video recording of the 1984 Reagan-Mondale presidential debate.