Band-Aid

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Band-Aid

(bănd′ād′)
A trademark for an adhesive bandage with a gauze pad in the center, employed to protect minor wounds. This trademark sometimes occurs in print in figurative uses: "True welfare reform is being bypassed for Band-Aid solutions" (Los Angeles Times)."These measures are mere Band-Aids" (U.S. News & World Report).
A trademark for a brand of bandages that has become a genericised term for any sterile adhesive plastic strip/gauze combination used to cover minor cuts or abrasions

Vox populi adjective Referring to a temporary solution for a problem that is best addressed elsewhere
Military medicine noun A popular term for a medical corpsman
References in periodicals archive ?
As a city, we should be clear on whether we are mortgaging our future for a bandaid today?
Dennis getting a bandaid applied: "My funny bone isn't laughin' anymore." (Cartoon, "Dennis the Menace," Hamilton, 10/28/16)
When Skippy came to he was huddled under a blankie in a kitty bed on the sofa, ice bag on his head, and with a bandaid on his brow.
Doleout systems, meanwhile, are just 'bandaid solutions,' she added.
The agency drives creative initiatives for a roster of clients including BabyCenter, BandAid, Splenda, Johnson & Johnson Healthy Essentials, the British Columbia Centre of Disease Control and Chef.io.
"The problem is when we try to put a bandaid on our hunger and don't ever feel fulfilled," she says.
bandaid, but it goes inside his head, fake flesh into real.
However, the distribution of books is not simply a charitable "bandaid" that remedies a symptom of injustice; Rx for Reading Detroit attacks a root cause of economic and educational inequality in our region.
Ian Campbell, from Ridgewood Crescent in Gosforth, called the plans an "expensive bandaid" which is "a disproportionate solution for a residential area".
Wonder how the guy got that scar on his eyebrow or why does this girl wear bright red lipstick in the middle of the day or why this kid has a bandaid on his knee?
My problem with this is "a pill for the ill" is a bandaid that covers up the real problem.
CUs could offer lower fees, however that is simply a bandaid solution to a far deeper systemic issue in the United State: ever decreasing financial literacy.