ballism


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bal·lis·mus

(bal-iz'mŭs),
A type of involuntary movement affecting the proximal limb musculature, manifested in jerking, flinging movements of the extremity; caused by a lesion of or near the contralateral subthalamic nucleus. Usually only one side of the body is involved, resulting in hemiballismus.
Synonym(s): ballism
[G. ballismos, a jumping about]

ballism

An extreme form of CHOREA in which the limbs are flung about violently. It is a disorder of the EXTRAPYRAMIDAL SYSTEM of the brain. STEREOTACTIC SURGERY may be helpful.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1, 4, 5) Instead, the production of involuntary movements met with serious difficulty, and only "choreoid hyperkinesia" as a model of ballism was succeeded by partial destruction of the contralateral subthalamic nucleus, (6) and athetosis by partial destruction of the anterior and posterior putamen in infant monkeys.
Hyperkinetic disorders (chorea, ballism) were explained by hyperactivity of the inhibitory putamino-pallidal pathway, resulting in a decrease in the pallido-thalamic inhibitory activity and hyperactivity of the thalamo-cortical pathways.
Involuntary movements in basal ganglia diseases include (1) tremor, (2) chorea, (3) ballism, (4) athetosis, and (5) dystonia.
In chorea and ballism, in addition to brief involuntary contraction at rest, sudden brief interruption of contraction occurs randomly in tonic isometric voluntary contraction.
Recently, there have been reports that ballism appears in vascular infarctions in the striatum (26) instead of the subthalamic nucleus, which is the classical site for hemiballism.
Chorea, or ballism, involves involuntary movement appearing at rest, and is considered as a purposeless movement by release phenomenon from inhibitory processes caused by disorders of the basal ganglia.
(7) Phasic involuntary movement such as chorea or ballism is considered to result from disinhibition of motor output caused by the disturbance of inhibitory mechanisms in the basal ganglia.
Fahn, "Chorea, ballism, athetosis," in Principles and Practice of Movement Disorders, J.
Tics may resemble other movement disorders, including stereotypies, dystonia, chorea, ballism, and myoclonus