Baermann technique

Baermann technique

a laboratory method for separating parasite larvae from feces, soil or herbage for counting or identification.
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A recent meta-analysis on the evaluation of conventional parasitological methods found the top sensitivity (89%) for APC, followed by the Baermann technique (72%), FECT (48%), and direct wet smear (21%) [22].
The Baermann technique is also a successful method for the recovery of small strongyles immature larvae in the faeces of clinically diseased horses.
There exists morphological similarities among the eggsof trichostrongylids, species differentiation is only possible through identification of L3 larvae isolated from coproculture through Baermann technique.
Results of direct examination and the Baermann technique were negative for all samples.
Infective third-stages larvae were recovered by the Baermann technique and their identification was made according to published keys [7, 18].
Identification of the parasite can be improved if the Baermann technique is used.
The fecal samples were collected from buffaloes (n=235) and cattle (n=210) and examined using Baermann technique.
It could also be due to low sensitivity of Baermann technique.
Horses found positive for strongyle type eggs were subjected to Baermann technique (Zajac and Conboy, 2006) for faecal culture to obtain third stage larvae (L 3).
Faecal samples from 163 captive and semi-captive individuals, 61 samples from wild individuals and 38 samples from captive groups of Bornean orangutans (Pongopygmaeus) in Kalimantan, Indonesia, were collected during one rainy season (November 2005-May 2006) and screened for intestinal parasites using sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin-concentration (SAFC), sedimentation, flotation, McMaster- and Baermann techniques.