Bacteroides


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Bacteroides

 [bak″tĕ-roi´dēz]
a genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms are part of the normal flora of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; some species are potential pathogens, causing possibly fatal abscesses and bacteremias. Pathogenic species include B. asaccharoly´ticus; B. fra´gilis, the most common anaerobic bacterium causing human infection, most frequently implicated in intra-abdominal infections, but found in bacteremias, abscesses, and other lesions throughout the body; B. fundibulifor´mis, an animal pathogen also found in chronic ulcer of the colon in humans; B. melaninoge´nicus, which occurs in oral, lung, and brain abscesses and in mixed infections; and B. thetaiotaomi´cron, the second most common anaerobic bacterium causing human infection (after B. fragilis).

bacteroides

 [bak″tĕ-roi´dēz]
1. any rod-shaped bacteria that can take many different shapes.
2. an organism of the genus Bacteroides.

Bacteroides

(bak'ter-oy'dēz),
A genus that includes many species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Bacteroidaceae) containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. Some species ferment carbohydrates and produce combinations of succinic, lactic, acetic, formic, or propionic acids, sometimes with short-chained alcohols; butyric acid is not a major product. Those species that do not ferment carbohydrates produce from peptone either trace to moderate amounts of succinic, formic, acetic, and lactic acids or major amounts of acetic and butyric acids with moderate amounts of alcohols and isovaleric, propionic, and isobutyric acids. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and to a lesser degree, the respiratory and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; many species formerly classified as Bacteroides have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic. The type species is Bacteroides fragilis.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]

Bac·te·roi·des

(bak-ter-oy'dēz)
A genus that includes species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Bacteroidaceae) containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. Some species ferment carbohydrates and produce combinations of succinic, lactic, acetic, formic, or propionic acids, sometimes with short-chained alcohols; butyric acid is not a major product. Those species that do not ferment carbohydrates produce from peptone either trace to moderate amounts of succinic, formic, acetic, and lactic acids or major amounts of acetic and butyric acids with moderate amounts of alcohols and isovaleric, propionic, and isobutyric acids. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and, to a lesser degree, the respiratory, and urogenital cavities of humans and animals. A number of Bacteroides species have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic. The type species is B. fragilis.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]

Bacteroides

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE, non-motile, ANAEROBIC bacteria normally occurring in the mouth and digestive tract. Some species can cause disease.

Bacteroides

a GENUS of ANAEROBIC, Gram-negative BACTERIA (see GRAM'S STAIN), found in man and other animals. Some SPECIES are OPPORTUNISTIC PATHOGENS. INFECTIONS due to Bacteroides are often a cause of peritonitis.

Bac·te·roi·des

(bak-ter-oy'dēz)
A genus that includes many species of obligate anaerobic, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative rods. Both motile and nonmotile species occur; motile cells are peritrichous. They are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract and to a lesser degree, the respiratory and urogenital cavities of humans and animals; many species formerly classified as Bacteroides have been reclassified as belonging to the genus Prevotella. Many species can be pathogenic.
[G. bacterion + eidos, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
Sears, "Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin cleaves the zonula adherens protein, E-cadherin," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
All wastewater samples collected from the site 1 septic tank were positive for both Bacteroides human-specific genetic markers, with average crossing threshold values of 24.1 and 31.0 for HF183 and HumM2 markers, respectively.
In this inflammatory process there is a reduction of the Bacteroides number and an increase of Firmicutes, a typical condition observed in obese subject [90].
By the end of the second year of life, Bacteroides are the main bacteria group found in the metabolome of healthy infants.
In this study, LLMDA did not detect any PCV DNA sequences from the pediatric ileal samples; however, LLMDA detected wild type rotavirus, human enterovirus B, small anellovirus, TTMV, and common gastrointestinal bacteria including Bacteroides, Shigella, and Streptococcus from some samples, suggesting that LLMDA could be used as a tool to monitor the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines and to detect reinfections and coinfections with other gastrointestinal viruses or bacteria that could cause pediatric gastrointestinal problems.
A PubMed search was conducted using the following search terms: ("Eikenella corrodens" OR "Bacteroides corrodens" OR "HB1") and ("vertebral osteomyelitis" OR "spondylitis" OR "discitis" OR "vertebra" OR "facet joint" OR "spine").
Species identification was confirmed as Bacteroides fragilis ssp.
This study have produced results similar to many previous studies in that the genera Bacteroides and Clostridium were two of the most common intestinal isolates of leopard frogs (Banas, J.
In the treatment of deep intramuscular abscesses such as iliopsoas abscess in elderly patients, VCM or carbapenem should be indicated to provide coverage for Staphylococcus aureus or anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides species.
show that a human-specific Bacteroides genetic marker provides a much
In the digestive tract of fish, bacteria belonging to the genus Bacteroides appear as late as on the 44th day afer hatching.