bioleaching

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Related to Bacterial leaching: Bioleaching

bioleaching

(bī′ō-lē′chĭng)
n.
The process of leaching metals from ore by using bacteria or fungi to convert the metals into a soluble form.

bi′o·leached′ adj.

bioleaching

The extraction of metals from sulphide ore by biologic processes or wild-type bacteria.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SAND, W., GEHRKE, T., HALLMANN, R., JOZSA, P.G., SCHIPPERS, A., Biochemistry of bacterial leaching - direct vs.
SCHIPPERS, A., SAND, W., Bacterial leaching of metal sulfides proceeds by two indirect mechanism via thiosulfate or via polysufides y sulfur.
Bacterial leaching was observed in all 6 lysimeters.
2005); 0.48-0.54% FC was recovered in flood treatments, while <0.1% FC was recovered in spray treatments, excluding bacterial leaching on the DSE application day.
Bacterial leaching was carried out in standard Erlenmeyer flasks (100mL, 250mL, 500 mL) filled to 40% of the capacity with contents of leaching medium (M9[K.sup.-] medium (without ferrous sulfate) + pulp density).
[7] studied the bacterial leaching of metal sulfides by different bacteria and observed diverse effects of different bacteria on leaching and the generation of sulfuric acid and Fe(III) ions by bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus/ Acidionus.
Jiang S, Buchan GD, Noonan M J, Smith N, Pang L, Close M (2008) Bacterial leaching from dairy shed effluent applied to a tine sandy loam under irrigated pasture.
The process involves bacterial leaching of the pyrite, neutralisation with limestone to remove acid and iron, removal of copper and nickel as saleable hydroxides, and the purification and recovery of cobalt by solvent extraction and electrowinning of cobalt.
The kinetics of chemical and bacterial leaching at 30 and 70 [degrees] C with t.
Dominique Morin, in the second chapter, discusses in some detail the bacterial leaching of refractory gold sulphide ores, after which Douglas Rawlings and David Woods describe the development of improved biomining bacteria.
Volume III covers Hydrometallurgy and the Electrometallurgy of Copper, under the following headings: leaching of copper minerals-theory and practice (5 papers); bacterial leaching and leaching of tailings (5 papers); separation and recovery processes (5 papers); impurity control and by-products (8 papers); copper electrorefining, cathode substrates and anode passivation (9 papers); electrorefining tankhouse operations and modernisation (9 papers); copper electrowinning (3 papers); and copper refining developments (6 papers).
A variety of micro-organisms, some as yet unknown, are associated with the bacterial leaching of minerals.

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