Bacillus

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Bacillus

 [bah-sil´us]
a genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming rods, most of which are gram-positive and motile. There are three pathogenic species: B. an´thracis, which causes anthrax; B. ce´reus, a common soil saprophyte that causes food poisoning by the formation of an enterotoxin in contaminated foods; and B. sub´tilis, a common soil and water saprophyte that often occurs as a laboratory contaminant and occasionally causes conjunctivitis. B. subtilis also produces the antibacterial agent bacitracin.

bacillus

 [bah-sil´us] (pl. bacil´li) (L.)
1. an organism of the genus Bacillus.
2. any rod-shaped bacterium.
anthrax bacillus Bacillus anthracis.
Calmette-Guérin bacillus bacille Calmette-Guērin.
coliform bacilli gram-negative bacilli found in the intestinal tract that resemble Escherichia coli, particularly in the fermentation of lactose with gas.
colon bacillus Escherichia coli.
glanders bacillus Pseudomonas mallei.
Hansen's bacillus Mycobacterium leprae.
legionnaire's bacillus Legionella pneumophila.
tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
typhoid bacillus Salmonella typhi.

Bacillus

(ba-sil'ŭs),
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods. Motile cells are peritrichous; spores are thick walled and take Gram stain poorly; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production. The type species is Bacillus subtilis.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, pl.

ba·cil·li

(ba-sil'ŭs, -ī),
1. A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the bacterial genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]

bacillus

(bə-sĭl′əs)
n. pl. ba·cilli (-sĭl′ī′)
1. Any of various bacteria, especially a rod-shaped bacterium.
2. Any of various rod-shaped, spore-forming, aerobic bacteria of the genus Bacillus that often occur in chains and include B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax.

bacillus

A rod-shaped bacterium.

Ba·cil·lus

(bă-sil'ŭs)
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria (family Bacillaceae) containing gram-positive rods. Motile cells are peritrichous; spores are thick-walled and stain poorly with Gram stain; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production. The type species is B. subtilis.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, pl. bacilli (bă-sil'ŭs, -ī)
1. A term used to refer to any member of the genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]

bacillus

1. A bacterium of the genus Bacillus , such as Bacillus anthracis , Bacillus cereus or Bacillus subtilis . These bacteria tend to form long chains.
2. Any bacterium, especially if rod-shaped.

bacillus

the general name for a rod-shaped BACTERIUM, but more specifically a generic name for a group of spore-producing forms, e.g. the hay bacillus Bacillus subtilis.

Bacillus

A rod-shaped bacterium. One common type of dysentery is known as bacillary dysentery because it is caused by a bacillus.
Mentioned in: Cholera, Diphtheria, Dysentery

Ba·cil·lus

(bă-sil'ŭs)
A genus of aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, spore-forming, ordinarily motile bacteria; these organisms are chemoheterotrophic and are found primarily in soil. A few species are animal pathogens; some species evoke antibody production.
[L. dim. of baculus, rod, staff]

ba·cil·lus

, bacilli (bă-sil'ŭs, -'ī)
1. A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the bacterial genus Bacillus.
2. Term used to refer to any rod-shaped bacterium.
[L. dim. of baculus, a rod, staff]