baby boomer

(redirected from Baby boomers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
A member of the post-World War II ‘baby boom’ generation, which corresponds to those individuals born after the end of WWII—1945 until 1964

baby boomer

Any person born in the years immediately following the end of World War II (usually defined as the years 1946–1964) when birth rates in the U.S. were unusually high.
References in periodicals archive ?
The report on the finance industry for baby boomers in the United States in July 2019 provides the readers with a detailed analysis on the landscape of commerce operating in the United States.
When asked about what the most important service their bank provided was, Millennials reflected much different attitudes than older Americans: Millennials were twice as likely as Baby Boomers to list a mobile app as most important (27 percent v 14 perent), while Baby Boomers were twice as likely to list in person presence (20 versus 11 percent).
The financial burden of the Great Depression, coupled with the many young men dying in World War Two, could explain the 100th of the end War One why World War One baby boomers experienced such high levels of childlessness.
This is significantly lower than other generations, including Gen X (50%) and baby boomers (42%), a TransUnion Health Care Millennial Report found.
Millennials and baby boomers in the UAE and Saudi Arabia feel they are represented better by the media than by advertising in their country of residence, according to new YouGov Omnibus research.
The study examined how different generations view cybersecurity threats, and found that baby boomers generally have better cybersecurity habits and are more concerned about protecting their personal information than younger generations.
HARTFORD, Conn.--Almost 90 percent of baby boomers are concerned about their retirement, bul significantly underestimate the income level they will require upon retirement.
Whether Baby Boomers, Generation X or Millennials, Americans of all ages worry about having enough money to fund their retirement, according to research by the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies.
Although many Americans think they are financially savvy, new data shows how the group closest to retirement, baby boomers, struggles with retirement fundamentals and is not saving enough for their golden years.
Survey takers were categorized as millennials, Generation X and baby boomers. The results showed that many millennials are planning ahead.