Babinski sign


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Ba·bin·ski sign

(bă-bin'skē),
1. extension of the great toe and abduction of the other toes instead of the normal flexion reflex to plantar stimulation, considered indicative of corticospinal tract involvement ("positive" Babinski); Synonym(s): Babinski phenomenon, Babinski reflex, great-toe reflex, paradoxic extensor reflex, toe phenomenon
2. in hemiplegia, weakness of the platysma muscle on the affected side, as is evident in such actions as blowing or opening the mouth;
3. when the patient is lying supine, with arms crossed on the front of the chest, and attempts to assume the sitting posture, the thigh on the side of an organic paralysis is flexed and the heel raised, whereas the limb on the sound side remains flat;
4. in hemiplegia, the forearm on the affected side turns to a pronated position when placed in a position of supination.

Babinski sign

A reflex movement of the big toe upward instead of downward when the plantar aspect of the foot is stroked, a manoeuvre used to test injury to, or diseases of, the upper motor neurons.

Babinski sign

Babinski's reflex, plantar reflex Neurology A reflex movement of the big toe upward instead of downward when the plantar aspect of the foot is stroked, a maneuver used to test injury to, or diseases of, the upper motor neurons

Ba·bin·ski sign

(bă-bin'skē sīn)
1. Extension of the great toe and abduction of the other toes instead of the normal flexion reflex to plantar stimulation, considered indicative of pyramidal tract involvement ("positive" Babinski);
Synonym(s): Babinski phenomenon, paradoxic extensor reflex.
2. In hemiplegia, weakness of the platysma muscle on the affected side, as is evident in such actions as blowing or opening the mouth.
3. When the patient is lying supine with arms crossed on the front of the chest, and attempts to assume the sitting posture, the thigh on the side of an organic paralysis is flexed and the heel raised, whereas the limb on the sound side remains flat.
4. In hemiplegia, the forearm on the affected side turns to a pronated position when placed in a position of supination.

Babinski,

Joseph François Félix, French neurologist, 1857-1932.
Babinski-Nageotte syndrome - brain lesions resulting in Horner syndrome.
Babinski phenomenon - Synonym(s): Babinski sign (1)
Babinski reflex - Synonym(s): Babinski sign (1)
Babinski sign - (1) extension of the great toe and abduction of the other toes instead of normal flexion reflex to plantar stimulation. Synonym(s): Babinski phenomenon; Babinski reflex; Babinski test; - (2) in hemiplegia, weakness of platysma muscle on affected side. - (3) when patient is in supine position with hands crossed on chest and attempts to sit up, the thigh on the side of an organic paralysis is flexed and heel raised, whereas unaffected side remains flat; - (4) in hemiplegia, the forearm on the affected side turns to a pronated position when placed in a position of supination.
Babinski syndrome - the combination of cardiac, arterial, and central nervous system manifestations of tertiary syphilis.
Babinski test - Synonym(s): Babinski sign (1)
References in periodicals archive ?
If such specific reflexes as the Babinski sign are useful in establishing a clinically-based presumptive diagnosis, either by their certain positivity or by their absence, TMS helps orientate these medical findings towards more specific investigations, such as the MRI.
They reported the most sensitive test was an exaggerated patellar tendon reflex (94%), followed by the Hoffmann sign (81%), Babinski sign (53%), and ankle clonus (35%).
Key words: Babinski, Plantar reflex, Babinski sign, Signe de l 'eventail, Modern neurological exam.
Physical examination revealed left ankle clonus, positive Babinski sign on the left, and left lower extremity weakness.
Neurologic deficit was localized to the left side and revealed a homonymous hemianopia, facial weakness, deviation of the tongue to the left, flaccid hemiparesis, hypoesthesis to pinprick sensation, hyperreflexia, and Babinski sign. The remainder of the physical examination was unremarkable.
On neurological examination the patient's right leg was weaker than the left (2/5 and 4/5 on Lovett test, respectively), the patellar reflex was exaggerated, and Babinski sign was positive bilaterally.
([dagger]) Upper motor neuron signs included increased tone, increased reflexes, Babinski sign, or abnormally slow finger or foot taps, and patterns of weakness included hemiparesis or weakness preferentially involving the distal extensor muscles.
On neurological examination, deep tendon reflexes (DTR) were exaggerated bilaterally; Babinski sign and palmo-mental reflex were present bilaterally.
The neurological examination demonstrated small reactive pupils, left-sided facial palsy, increased left-sided reflexes, left hemiplegia, and a left Babinski sign. The rest of the physical examination was normal.
Dysphagia, imbalance, and hiccups were added in the follow-up, and a neurologic examination on the ninth day showed limitation of downward movements in his right eye and vertical nystagmus, mild deviation of his tongue to the right, paresis of the right palatal arch, and left Babinski sign. The patient had left focal-onset secondary generalized seizures on the tenth day.